Magnesium- what is it and how can I get enough in my diet?

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

What is Magnesium?

  • Magnesium is a mineral that you need every day for good health.
  • Magnesium helps you take energy from food and make new proteins.
  • It is also an important part of your bones, and helps keep your muscles and nerves healthy.
  • Some people find that magnesium-rich foods or supplements help to reduce their cramping and muscle soreness.
  • The best sources of magnesium are legumes, nuts, seeds, fish and whole grains.

 

How much Magnesium should I aim for?

Daily target

Men 19-30yrs

330mg

Men 30+yrs

350mg

Women 19-30yrs

255mg

Women 30+yrs

265mg

** Magnesium from supplements should not exceed 350 mg per day. It is safe to consume more than your daily magnesium needs from food.

 

How can I get enough Magnesium without taking supplements?

The following table shows you which foods are good sources of Magnesium.

Food

Serving size

Magnesium (mg)

All bran

30g

83

 

Almonds

page2image11600

1⁄4 cup

 

123

 

Banana

 

1 med

 

25

 

Brazil nuts

page2image18416

1⁄4 cup

 

116

Brown rice

 

1 cup

page2image23672

86

Cashews

1⁄4 cup

83

 

Dark chocolate

page2image29200

40g

 

48

Firm tofu

 

150g

page2image34376

112

Greek yogurt

175g

28

Hazelnuts

page2image39864

1⁄4 cup

53

Kale, cooked

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Diet Culture and Kids.

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

 

Cassandra Stuchbery, Dietitan.

How ‘dieting’ might be affecting your kids.

The phrase ‘diet culture’ has been gaining a lot of interest in the past few years. It’s used to describe any words, phrases, products or activities that encourage eating according to strict rules. Here are some signs that you might be a part of ‘diet culture’:

  • You use words like ‘good’ and ‘bad’ to describe foods (apart from milk that’s gone bad for example)
  • You follow a set of rules when you eat eg. Not eating after 8pm, not eating bread, only having low fat foods
  • You are avoiding a certain food group to try to lose weight eg. Keto, paleo, vegan
  • The way you eat tends to get in the way of your social life or family life (maybe you’re cooking separate dinners, can’t eat out etc.)

The problem with this kind of thinking is that it teaches us to ignore our internal body signals. At the end of the day even the smartest people in the world can’t know what your body needs better than you (the person walking around in it!). Kids have an amazing innate sense of hunger and fullness which guides them in how much to eat … read more »

ITBS or Iliotibial Band Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist)

Do you experience pain on the outer part of your leg? Is it possible that you may have a problem with your ITB?

ITB stands for the iliotibial band. The iliotibial band is not a muscle, it is fascia that runs down the side of your leg. Since it is not a muscle, stretches for it are ineffective. Many people roll their ITB along a foam roller to loosen it, but often that does not resolve their pain.

The ITB is attached to several muscles in the hip. The tensor fascia latae (TFL) and the gluteus maximus (your buttocks) are the two major ones. Dysfunction of these muscles can cause the ITB to “tighten” and cause pain. This condition is called ITBS (iliotibial band syndrome).

Here are examples of some exercises that may be prescribed to you by your practitioner:

Sidelying plank with hip abduction:

Lying on your side, lift your body up over your forearm.

Move your top leg up, then down.

Repeat.

 

 

 

Isometric external rotation:

Lying on your stomach, touch both heels together

Push the heels together and hold for 5 seconds.

You can palpate your glutes to ensure that they are activating

Relax. Then … read more »

Stretching

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Everyone knows that stretching and gaining flexibility is a great way to help reduce the chance of injury, but you may be unaware of the different types of stretching and when each type is optimally used.

Below I have explained the two main types of stretching with examples for the lower limbs that you can practice at home.

Dynamic Stretching is when you stretch the muscle in an active repetitive motion. This is best used within a warm up preparing the body for the range of motion ahead. An example of dynamic stretching is leg swings.

Leg swings- Using a wall, fence or object next to you for support, swing one leg forward and back like a pendulum. Ensure your posture is tall and the rest of the body is upright, all of the range of motion should be coming from the hip joint. Gradually ease into the movement and increase the range of swing over time. Aim for 20 leg swings then swap legs.

Static Stretching is when you hold the stretch of the muscle for a period of time, normally around 30-40 seconds. Static stretching is best to be preformed after exercise when the muscle is warm.

Below

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What makes a good shoe?

by (Podiatrist)

Footwear

Footwear can play a vital role in preventing and managing injuries, as well as allow us to perform at our best. Whether it is for sport, walking, or using for work it is important you are wearing shoes that fit properly and support your feet.

Poorly fitted footwear can lead to blisters and corns, and toenails problems such as ingrown toenails or black toenails. It may also contribute to bunion formation.

What makes a good shoe?

 

  • A deep and wide toe box – This ensures the toe have enough room reducing risk of increased pressure.
  • A fastening mechanism – for example laces, a buckle or a strap. This is very important for support and stability.   A slip on shoe requires your toes to have to grip onto the shoes.  This means the muscles are working hard to keep the shoe on your foot. May lead to claw/hammer toes.
  • Strong heel counter, this is the back of the shoe, this should not be easily collapsible.
  • The shoe should flex at toe joints not the middle of the shoe
  • Have a good torsion system.

 

For more information please watch our video on what makes a good shoe here.… read more »

Runners Knee – Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Running. For some of you this is an activity that stopped eons ago. A forgotten activity that your body once endured. For others it is part of your daily life, like brushing your teeth or eating breakfast. But for those of you like me, your relationship with running is not so black and white.  Your running routine comes in peaks and troughs, dictated by little niggles, aches and sometimes even the seasons. The most common area of complaint in runners that I see here at Stay Tuned is the knee.

The most common cause of knee pain in runners is patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), or runner’s knee. This occurs when the patella, otherwise known as the knee cap does not track within the groove at the end of the femur (thigh bone) properly, creating friction between these structures. Those with PFPS may feel discomfort at the front of the knee when going up or down stairs, squatting, or sitting down with the knees bent for an extended period of time. Unlike other injuries there is not always an obvious cause for the development of this condition, instead there may be multiple factors as to why the patella does not track … read more »

‘Bring a plate’ Salad Options

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

It is coming into the Christmas season and with many parties coming up you may be asked to bring a salad or plate of food to share. Why not try one of these yummy dietitan approved salads!

Green Bean Salad with Basil and Balsamic

  • Prep time:10 minutes
  • Cook time:15 minutes
  • Yield:Serves 6

To save time, while the water is coming to a boil, prep the other ingredients.

INGREDIENTSbring a plate beans

  • 700g trimmed green beans, cut to 5cm long pieces
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
  • 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil
  • 3/4 cup chopped fresh basil leaves

METHOD

1 Soak chopped onions in water: Place the chopped onions in a small bowl of water. This will help take the edge off the onions. Let sit while you prepare the rest of the salad.

2 Blanch the green beans: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil (2 Tbsp salt for 2L of water). Add the green beans to the water and blanch only for about 2 minutes or so, until the beans are just barely cooked through, but still crisp. Fresh young beans should cook quickly. Older, tougher beans may take longer.

 

3 Shock in ice water:read more »

Mat Pilates Exercises to Try at Home!

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Mat Pilates is well known form of exercise and is commonly used as a beginner level for new clients wishing to try Pilates. The focus of mat Pilates is to establish the body’s core or ‘powerhouse’ as creator Joseph Pilates would have called it. The ‘Powerhouse’ refers to the muscles of the pelvic floor, lower back, hips, glutes and abdomen. Establishing control and strength in these muscles is the function of Pilates.

Below are some examples of Mat Pilates exercises that can be completed at home. Please make sure you have medical clearance before trying any new exercises at home.

pilates 100s BrookePilates 100’s-

Start lying on your back. Roll the head and shoulder up off the mat and engage the core. Leg should be lifted off the mat also and held long in front of the body or in table top (bent) position as an alternative.

The arms should be held to the side of the body held out straight and long. In a controlled manner, the arms should beat up and down while taking five short breaths in and five short breaths out.

The focus of this exercise should be on keep the body still and controlled while the arms … read more »

Osteoarthritis – Do I need a replacement?

by (Physiotherapist)

arthritis KhoaAs a physiotherapist, one question I find that is commonly asked by patients to me is – I’ve been diagnosed with arthritis, when do I know I need a total hip or a total knee replacement?

Firstly let’s define arthritis. It involves the degeneration of cartilage within the joint itself – cartilage is the connective tissue that lines the end of each bone and stops them from rubbing directly over each other when we move. In arthritis, this cartilage layer has degenerated, thus getting “bone on bone” and hence, the production of pain. There are two main types of arthritis – rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). They differ based on the way the cartilage degenerates. In RA, the immune system of the body attacks the cartilage for some yet to be determined reason. This is often managed with medication and carefully managed exercise. Osteoarthritis on the hand, is caused by “wear and tear” in which constant grinding of the cartilage over life has caused the cartilage to wear away – this is the more common form of arthritis seen in people.

Unfortunately cartilage do not grow back. So you may be asking how is this pain managed?

Physiotherapy management … read more »

Massage & The Pregnant Body

by (Remedial Massage Therapist & Pilates Instructor)

There are many physiological, structural, and psychological changes that occur daily when you’re pregnant. You may experience constant growing pains from the increase in bodily mass, hormonal changes, and continuous dropping of the pelvis. Massage therapy can provide significant relief from all those aches and pains to enhance the happiness of your pregnancy journey.

pregnant client Anita thoroughly enjoys treating mothers throughout their entire pregnancy. She believes massage therapy provides a connection from mother to baby and can simply relax the body and mind.

Anita likes to offer a soft or firm pressure of your choice to help reduce any tension you may be holding. Our plush pregnancy pillow allows for maximum support of the belly to provide extreme comfort.

 

Anita believes the following points can help with your pregnancy journey.

  • Regular pregnancy massage can help soften the muscles around the lungs and thoracic cage, which helps to expand breathing capability and can provide more oxygen to your baby.

 

  • Massage can improve skin elasticity, increases flexibility and tone to the muscles, which can help ease muscle cramps and reduce stress on weight bearing joints.

 

  • Massage works very effectively on the nervous system. A decrease in internal stresses can help
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