Diaphragmatic Breathing

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Diaphragmatic Breathing

What is the Diaphragm?

The Diaphragm is the most efficient muscle of breathing. It is a large, dome-shaped muscle located at the base of the lungs. Your abdominal muscles help move the Diaphragm and give you more power to empty your lungs. When you become stressed or anxious, your breathing will become shallower. This means that the Diaphragm will not function as well as it should and the accessory muscles of breathing – which are located in your neck and chest – will do most of the work.

This can leave the Diaphragm weakened and flattened, causing it to work less efficiently, as well as the neck and chest muscles being overworked.

What is Diaphragmatic Breathing?

Diaphragmatic breathing is intended to help you use the Diaphragm correctly while breathing to:

  • Strengthen the Diaphragm
  • Decrease the work of breathing by slowing your breathing rate
  • Decrease oxygen demand
  • Use less effort and energy to breathe
Diaphragmatic Breathing Technique

Lie on your back on a flat surface or in bed, with your knees bent and your head supported. You can use a pillow under your knees to support your legs. Place one hand on your upper chest and the other just

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Progressive Muscle Relaxation

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PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION

Now, I want you to release your shoulders from your ears, unclench your jaw and take a deep breath in, and now, out. Did you realise that you were EVEN carrying tension in these areas and, do you know for HOW long you were tensing for? If you answered no to both questions, then Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) may be the perfect tool for you to become more aware of how your body responds to stress, anxiety or fear. PMR is a relaxation sequence of tensing an area of the body for 5 seconds and relaxing for 10 seconds. Like with learning any new skill, the more practice you do, the better you will become at noticing how your muscles react to stress and, most importantly, how to train them to respond differently!

 

Progressive Muscle Relaxation setup

TIPS

  • Tell your muscles to ‘let go’or ‘relax’
  • Schedule practice into your diary!
  • Be comfortable: sit in a supportive chair, wear loose clothing, take your shoes off
  • Minimise distractions: Dim the lights, mute your phone and pop away in another room
  • If you have any physical injuries, please consult a Stay Tuned practitioner or your doctor before beginning

 

PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE read more »

Osteopathy, Fatherhood and Sport.

by (Osteopath)

As an Osteopath with 3 active under teenage kids, I have the invaluable experience of watching my kids develop physically while playing a number of sports: tennis, swimming, ballet, lacrosse, basketball and nippers.

In fact I’m poolside now at 5.50am in a chilly Melbourne Monday morning. Brrrr!

At 12 years old our eldest boy is swimming more than 30km a week, plus basketball and nippers.

30km! Some would say that’s a lot for a 12 year old, especially considering that my eldest is not in the least bulked up with muscle.

How has he got there?

It’s a progression, a build, to get to this point, and it’s a path that the body has to take to accommodate the wants of its owner. He has had some aches and pains and they will always happen when loading the body, but he has never had a major injury and there are a couple of reasons for this…

🔹Management/ treatment of past major issues and the recording or remembering of them. You would not believe how many people forget a broken bone or an operation!

🔹Then there is the ‘dad, my arm hurts here 👇’ scenario, whereby we immediately

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Healthy Eating on a Vegan Diet

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Vegan DietPlant-based and vegan diets are becoming more and more popular each day. In fact, according to Google Trends, searches on the word ‘vegan’ have increased by almost 200% in the past 5 years. Some of the reasons are the rise in the awareness of animal welfare and the impact of our food on the environment but people are also ditching animal products as a way to improve their health.

The Benefits:

There is some research to show that vegan diets can reduce your risk of obesity, artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and some types of cancer. These benefits, however, depend on you having a well-balanced eating plan with enough nutrients.

The Risks:

As with any change in your eating habits it’s very easy to miss out on crucial vitamins and minerals when reducing the variety of foods that you eat. Meats, for example, are rich sources of protein, easily digestible iron and vitamin B12. Dairy products are also rich in vitamin B12 and contain high levels of calcium.

The side-effects of not getting enough nutrition when eating vegan could be:

  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Heart palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vision loss
  • Dizziness
  • Depression
  • Memory loss
  • Tingling in hands and feet
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How to Best Provide Ankle Support for Netballers –Kids, Teenagers and Adults 

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Every Saturday you can probably guarantee that a handful of us “lucky” netballers will come away from the courts with “twisted/turned/sprained” ankles.

Why?

Netball is a game that involves an immense amount of dodging and quick turns. Unfortunately, these movements can put pressure on the lateral ligaments of the ankle. If we happen to overdo it and go into too much inversion (rolling in) we can actually sprain these ligaments.

Due to the nature of the healing process, if damaged ligaments will only regain 80% of their original strength. This means that the ligament will always be a little weaker.

What can we do?

Now apart from doing an excellent rehabilitation program to strengthen the surrounding muscles and improving proprioception, the best thing that netballers can do to provide stability while on the court is to tape or brace the ankle.

Taping

On TV you’ll see that the Australian Diamonds and athletes that play in the Suncorp Super Netball League will mostly decide to tape. This is because they have access to trained professionals who know exactly how to tape ankles for the players specific needs.

At the professional level all teams are looking to get an edge. There has … read more »

Tips and tricks for new Mums!

by (Remedial Massage Therapist)

In my time as a Massage Therapist I have come across many ladies with what I call ‘Mum Posture’. It wasn’t until I became a Mum and started living the day to day life first hand that I realized the full extent of what causes this.

From breastfeeding your little one, to carrying them on your hip for hours and forever hanging over the cot trying to get them to nap. This combined with lack of sleep or time to recharge our own batteries, it is no wonder our bodies end up tired and sore.

When our shoulders are hunched this has a follow on effect on our pec, back and neck muscles causing pain and sometimes headaches.

In keeping with the theme of Mothers Day I thought I would share with you a few stretches to help with that ‘Mum Posture’. I’ve also shared some tips I’ve discovered along the way and things you can do to help yourself!

STRETCHES

Sarah Pec Stretch

Mum Stretch #1 – Pec Stretch and Thoracic Rotation

This is a handy stretch to do anytime you are feeling hunched over. Grab a broom stick and bring it up and over your head. You will feel this stretch … read more »

Magnesium- what is it and how can I get enough in my diet?

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

What is Magnesium?

  • Magnesium is a mineral that you need every day for good health.
  • Magnesium helps you take energy from food and make new proteins.
  • It is also an important part of your bones, and helps keep your muscles and nerves healthy.
  • Some people find that magnesium-rich foods or supplements help to reduce their cramping and muscle soreness.
  • The best sources of magnesium are legumes, nuts, seeds, fish and whole grains.

 

How much Magnesium should I aim for?

Daily target

Men 19-30yrs

330mg

Men 30+yrs

350mg

Women 19-30yrs

255mg

Women 30+yrs

265mg

** Magnesium from supplements should not exceed 350 mg per day. It is safe to consume more than your daily magnesium needs from food.

 

How can I get enough Magnesium without taking supplements?

The following table shows you which foods are good sources of Magnesium.

Food

Serving size

Magnesium (mg)

All bran

30g

83

 

Almonds

page2image11600

1⁄4 cup

 

123

 

Banana

 

1 med

 

25

 

Brazil nuts

page2image18416

1⁄4 cup

 

116

Brown rice

 

1 cup

page2image23672

86

Cashews

1⁄4 cup

83

 

Dark chocolate

page2image29200

40g

 

48

Firm tofu

 

150g

page2image34376

112

Greek yogurt

175g

28

Hazelnuts

page2image39864

1⁄4 cup

53

Kale, cooked

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Diet Culture and Kids.

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

 

Cassandra Stuchbery, Dietitan.

How ‘dieting’ might be affecting your kids.

The phrase ‘diet culture’ has been gaining a lot of interest in the past few years. It’s used to describe any words, phrases, products or activities that encourage eating according to strict rules. Here are some signs that you might be a part of ‘diet culture’:

  • You use words like ‘good’ and ‘bad’ to describe foods (apart from milk that’s gone bad for example)
  • You follow a set of rules when you eat eg. Not eating after 8pm, not eating bread, only having low fat foods
  • You are avoiding a certain food group to try to lose weight eg. Keto, paleo, vegan
  • The way you eat tends to get in the way of your social life or family life (maybe you’re cooking separate dinners, can’t eat out etc.)

The problem with this kind of thinking is that it teaches us to ignore our internal body signals. At the end of the day even the smartest people in the world can’t know what your body needs better than you (the person walking around in it!). Kids have an amazing innate sense of hunger and fullness which guides them in how much to eat … read more »

ITBS or Iliotibial Band Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist)

Do you experience pain on the outer part of your leg? Is it possible that you may have a problem with your ITB?

ITB stands for the iliotibial band. The iliotibial band is not a muscle, it is fascia that runs down the side of your leg. Since it is not a muscle, stretches for it are ineffective. Many people roll their ITB along a foam roller to loosen it, but often that does not resolve their pain.

The ITB is attached to several muscles in the hip. The tensor fascia latae (TFL) and the gluteus maximus (your buttocks) are the two major ones. Dysfunction of these muscles can cause the ITB to “tighten” and cause pain. This condition is called ITBS (iliotibial band syndrome).

Here are examples of some exercises that may be prescribed to you by your practitioner:

Sidelying plank with hip abduction:

Lying on your side, lift your body up over your forearm.

Move your top leg up, then down.

Repeat.

 

 

 

Isometric external rotation:

Lying on your stomach, touch both heels together

Push the heels together and hold for 5 seconds.

You can palpate your glutes to ensure that they are activating

Relax. Then … read more »

Stretching

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Everyone knows that stretching and gaining flexibility is a great way to help reduce the chance of injury, but you may be unaware of the different types of stretching and when each type is optimally used.

Below I have explained the two main types of stretching with examples for the lower limbs that you can practice at home.

Dynamic Stretching is when you stretch the muscle in an active repetitive motion. This is best used within a warm up preparing the body for the range of motion ahead. An example of dynamic stretching is leg swings.

Leg swings- Using a wall, fence or object next to you for support, swing one leg forward and back like a pendulum. Ensure your posture is tall and the rest of the body is upright, all of the range of motion should be coming from the hip joint. Gradually ease into the movement and increase the range of swing over time. Aim for 20 leg swings then swap legs.

Static Stretching is when you hold the stretch of the muscle for a period of time, normally around 30-40 seconds. Static stretching is best to be preformed after exercise when the muscle is warm.

Below

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