Healthy Eating on a Vegan Diet

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Vegan DietPlant-based and vegan diets are becoming more and more popular each day. In fact, according to Google Trends, searches on the word ‘vegan’ have increased by almost 200% in the past 5 years. Some of the reasons are the rise in the awareness of animal welfare and the impact of our food on the environment but people are also ditching animal products as a way to improve their health.

The Benefits:

There is some research to show that vegan diets can reduce your risk of obesity, artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and some types of cancer. These benefits, however, depend on you having a well-balanced eating plan with enough nutrients.

The Risks:

As with any change in your eating habits it’s very easy to miss out on crucial vitamins and minerals when reducing the variety of foods that you eat. Meats, for example, are rich sources of protein, easily digestible iron and vitamin B12. Dairy products are also rich in vitamin B12 and contain high levels of calcium.

The side-effects of not getting enough nutrition when eating vegan could be:

  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Heart palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vision loss
  • Dizziness
  • Depression
  • Memory loss
  • Tingling in hands and feet
read more »

How to Best Provide Ankle Support for Netballers –Kids, Teenagers and Adults 

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Every Saturday you can probably guarantee that a handful of us “lucky” netballers will come away from the courts with “twisted/turned/sprained” ankles.

Why?

Netball is a game that involves an immense amount of dodging and quick turns. Unfortunately, these movements can put pressure on the lateral ligaments of the ankle. If we happen to overdo it and go into too much inversion (rolling in) we can actually sprain these ligaments.

Due to the nature of the healing process, if damaged ligaments will only regain 80% of their original strength. This means that the ligament will always be a little weaker.

What can we do?

Now apart from doing an excellent rehabilitation program to strengthen the surrounding muscles and improving proprioception, the best thing that netballers can do to provide stability while on the court is to tape or brace the ankle.

Taping

On TV you’ll see that the Australian Diamonds and athletes that play in the Suncorp Super Netball League will mostly decide to tape. This is because they have access to trained professionals who know exactly how to tape ankles for the players specific needs.

At the professional level all teams are looking to get an edge. There has … read more »

Tips and tricks for new Mums!

by (Remedial Massage Therapist)

In my time as a Massage Therapist I have come across many ladies with what I call ‘Mum Posture’. It wasn’t until I became a Mum and started living the day to day life first hand that I realized the full extent of what causes this.

From breastfeeding your little one, to carrying them on your hip for hours and forever hanging over the cot trying to get them to nap. This combined with lack of sleep or time to recharge our own batteries, it is no wonder our bodies end up tired and sore.

When our shoulders are hunched this has a follow on effect on our pec, back and neck muscles causing pain and sometimes headaches.

In keeping with the theme of Mothers Day I thought I would share with you a few stretches to help with that ‘Mum Posture’. I’ve also shared some tips I’ve discovered along the way and things you can do to help yourself!

STRETCHES

Sarah Pec Stretch

Mum Stretch #1 – Pec Stretch and Thoracic Rotation

This is a handy stretch to do anytime you are feeling hunched over. Grab a broom stick and bring it up and over your head. You will feel this stretch … read more »

Abdominal Separation AKA DRAM. What is it and can it be treated?

by (Physiotherapist)

What is Abdominal Separation AKA DRAM?

by Khoa Pham

Abdominal separation also know as Diastasis Rectis Abdominis (DRAM) is commonly overlooked after giving birth. A DRAM is a separation down the middle of the abdominal muscles, see picture below. It is important to get a DRAM assessed because it can increase your risk of having low back issues, hernias and pelvic instability later in life.

DRAM

What causes a DRAM?

DRAMs can be affected by factors such as:

  • Hormonal changes
  • Weight gain
  • Abdominal muscle weakness and
  • Abdominal muscle stretching due to growth of the baby.

It can also affect men who have placed excessive stress on their abdominal muscles.

How can a DRAM cause lower back issues?

A simple explanation of how a weak core (caused by a DRAM) can result in lower back issues is:

When the Transverse Abdominis (TA) is not activated properly, there is less support for the ligaments and bony structures of your back when you’re doing day-to-day things. This increases your risk of injury. The TA is one of your most important core muscles, it lies below the six-pack muscle and wraps around your back to support it like a corset.

Is a DRAM treatable?

Yes, … read more »

Magnesium- what is it and how can I get enough in my diet?

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

What is Magnesium?

  • Magnesium is a mineral that you need every day for good health.
  • Magnesium helps you take energy from food and make new proteins.
  • It is also an important part of your bones, and helps keep your muscles and nerves healthy.
  • Some people find that magnesium-rich foods or supplements help to reduce their cramping and muscle soreness.
  • The best sources of magnesium are legumes, nuts, seeds, fish and whole grains.

 

How much Magnesium should I aim for?

Daily target

Men 19-30yrs

330mg

Men 30+yrs

350mg

Women 19-30yrs

255mg

Women 30+yrs

265mg

** Magnesium from supplements should not exceed 350 mg per day. It is safe to consume more than your daily magnesium needs from food.

 

How can I get enough Magnesium without taking supplements?

The following table shows you which foods are good sources of Magnesium.

Food

Serving size

Magnesium (mg)

All bran

30g

83

 

Almonds

page2image11600

1⁄4 cup

 

123

 

Banana

 

1 med

 

25

 

Brazil nuts

page2image18416

1⁄4 cup

 

116

Brown rice

 

1 cup

page2image23672

86

Cashews

1⁄4 cup

83

 

Dark chocolate

page2image29200

40g

 

48

Firm tofu

 

150g

page2image34376

112

Greek yogurt

175g

28

Hazelnuts

page2image39864

1⁄4 cup

53

Kale, cooked

read more »

Diet Culture and Kids.

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

 

Cassandra Stuchbery, Dietitan.

How ‘dieting’ might be affecting your kids.

The phrase ‘diet culture’ has been gaining a lot of interest in the past few years. It’s used to describe any words, phrases, products or activities that encourage eating according to strict rules. Here are some signs that you might be a part of ‘diet culture’:

  • You use words like ‘good’ and ‘bad’ to describe foods (apart from milk that’s gone bad for example)
  • You follow a set of rules when you eat eg. Not eating after 8pm, not eating bread, only having low fat foods
  • You are avoiding a certain food group to try to lose weight eg. Keto, paleo, vegan
  • The way you eat tends to get in the way of your social life or family life (maybe you’re cooking separate dinners, can’t eat out etc.)

The problem with this kind of thinking is that it teaches us to ignore our internal body signals. At the end of the day even the smartest people in the world can’t know what your body needs better than you (the person walking around in it!). Kids have an amazing innate sense of hunger and fullness which guides them in how much to eat … read more »

ITBS or Iliotibial Band Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist)

Do you experience pain on the outer part of your leg? Is it possible that you may have a problem with your ITB?

ITB stands for the iliotibial band. The iliotibial band is not a muscle, it is fascia that runs down the side of your leg. Since it is not a muscle, stretches for it are ineffective. Many people roll their ITB along a foam roller to loosen it, but often that does not resolve their pain.

The ITB is attached to several muscles in the hip. The tensor fascia latae (TFL) and the gluteus maximus (your buttocks) are the two major ones. Dysfunction of these muscles can cause the ITB to “tighten” and cause pain. This condition is called ITBS (iliotibial band syndrome).

Here are examples of some exercises that may be prescribed to you by your practitioner:

Sidelying plank with hip abduction:

Lying on your side, lift your body up over your forearm.

Move your top leg up, then down.

Repeat.

 

 

 

Isometric external rotation:

Lying on your stomach, touch both heels together

Push the heels together and hold for 5 seconds.

You can palpate your glutes to ensure that they are activating

Relax. Then … read more »

Stretching

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Everyone knows that stretching and gaining flexibility is a great way to help reduce the chance of injury, but you may be unaware of the different types of stretching and when each type is optimally used.

Below I have explained the two main types of stretching with examples for the lower limbs that you can practice at home.

Dynamic Stretching is when you stretch the muscle in an active repetitive motion. This is best used within a warm up preparing the body for the range of motion ahead. An example of dynamic stretching is leg swings.

Leg swings- Using a wall, fence or object next to you for support, swing one leg forward and back like a pendulum. Ensure your posture is tall and the rest of the body is upright, all of the range of motion should be coming from the hip joint. Gradually ease into the movement and increase the range of swing over time. Aim for 20 leg swings then swap legs.

Static Stretching is when you hold the stretch of the muscle for a period of time, normally around 30-40 seconds. Static stretching is best to be preformed after exercise when the muscle is warm.

Below

read more »

What makes a good shoe?

by (Podiatrist)

Footwear

Footwear can play a vital role in preventing and managing injuries, as well as allow us to perform at our best. Whether it is for sport, walking, or using for work it is important you are wearing shoes that fit properly and support your feet.

Poorly fitted footwear can lead to blisters and corns, and toenails problems such as ingrown toenails or black toenails. It may also contribute to bunion formation.

What makes a good shoe?

 

  • A deep and wide toe box – This ensures the toe have enough room reducing risk of increased pressure.
  • A fastening mechanism – for example laces, a buckle or a strap. This is very important for support and stability.   A slip on shoe requires your toes to have to grip onto the shoes.  This means the muscles are working hard to keep the shoe on your foot. May lead to claw/hammer toes.
  • Strong heel counter, this is the back of the shoe, this should not be easily collapsible.
  • The shoe should flex at toe joints not the middle of the shoe
  • Have a good torsion system.

 

For more information please watch our video on what makes a good shoe here.… read more »

Runners Knee – Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Running. For some of you this is an activity that stopped eons ago. A forgotten activity that your body once endured. For others it is part of your daily life, like brushing your teeth or eating breakfast. But for those of you like me, your relationship with running is not so black and white.  Your running routine comes in peaks and troughs, dictated by little niggles, aches and sometimes even the seasons. The most common area of complaint in runners that I see here at Stay Tuned is the knee.

The most common cause of knee pain in runners is patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), or runner’s knee. This occurs when the patella, otherwise known as the knee cap does not track within the groove at the end of the femur (thigh bone) properly, creating friction between these structures. Those with PFPS may feel discomfort at the front of the knee when going up or down stairs, squatting, or sitting down with the knees bent for an extended period of time. Unlike other injuries there is not always an obvious cause for the development of this condition, instead there may be multiple factors as to why the patella does not track … read more »