What is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist and why should I see one?

by (Physiotherapist)

What is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist (AEP) and why should I see one?

Accredited Exercise Physiologists are university qualified allied health professionals equipped with the knowledge and skills to design, deliver and evaluate safe and effective exercise interventions. These can be for people with acute, sub-acute or chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities.

What are the requirements for becoming an AEP?

The requirements for becoming an AEP is to complete a minimum of 4 years university study at both a graduate level and post graduate (Masters) level. AEP’s are also required to complete over 500 hours of placement that gives them exposure not only to the healthy population but also to different conditions such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, neurological, mental health and cancer related conditions.

What is the difference between a Physio and an AEP?

The major difference is that AEP’s are unable to perform any form of manual therapy (hands on) to the client such as mobilisations, massage and manipulations. They can however do assessments similar to Physio’s like range of motion, manual muscle testing and other special tests. The primary mode of treatment of AEP’s is exercise which is more of hands off therapy.

What is the difference read more »

A day on a plate of a Dietitian

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

A day on a plate of a Dietitian

I work every day with people who are trying to change their eating to improve their health, feel more energy and manage hunger and cravings. I love to offer people time saving tips, places to look for recipes and ways to make sure their food is nutritious even if they’re in a hurry. This often makes people ask – what do you eat? So here it is! A day in the life of a dietitian (roughly).

I do want to preface this by saying that this diet is specific to me, I am a young(ish), 5’7” female who exercises for an hour most days. This diet is almost definitely not the right one for you but if you’d like to me to help you find what is you’re welcome to ask me.

7:30am wake up

I am not, I repeat NOT, a morning person. So I manage to pull myself out of bed each morning but I’m usually in a rush to get ready.

8:00am breakfast

Although I’m in such a rush I always make time for breakfast, albeit a quick one. My favourite breakfast is Greek yogurt, home-made stewed fruit and … read more »

My Favourite Exercises

by (Physiotherapist)

My Favourite Exercises!

Exercise is one the most easily prescribed mode of treatment to improve health and wellbeing. There is irrefutable evidence that suggests the beneficial effects of exercise to prevent and treat several diseases. I feel privileged that I am able to use exercise as a form of treatment. In doing so, I always make sure that my client knows what the exercise is, how to do the exercise properly, why we’re doing this exercise and the benefits of the exercise. I always look for exercises where I can get the most benefit, meaning maximizing gains while promoting stability and control. Here are my top three prescribed exercises.

1. Glute Bridges
Personally, I think the gluteals are the most underrated muscle in the body. Some people would prefer bigger chest or back or biceps or triceps. They do not realize that it’s the gluteals that hold everything together. Gluteal muscle strength and endurance play a significant role in injury prevention, normalizing gait pattern and posture, eliminating pain and enhancing athletic performance.

The beauty of performing glute bridges is that unlike any other lower limb or hip exercise, you perform this exercise lying down, knees and feet hip width apart. … read more »

Have FUN with fruit!

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Have FUN with fruit!

Fruit is a great natural source of vitamins, fibre and energy. The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating recommends that most people eat 2 servings of fruit every day. Try out the recipes for some new and different ways to eat fruit.

Strawberry and Kiwifruit Popsicles

Strawberry and Kiwifruit popsiclesTakes 5min + freezing time

Makes 6

Ingredients

· 6 plastic cups + 6 popsicle sticks (or an icy pole mould)

· 250g strawberries, hulled and sliced

· 2 kiwifruit, peeled and chopped

· 1 ½ cups orange juice

Method

Drop strawberries and kiwi fruit into each disposable cup or icy pole mould. Pour orange juice over fruit, add a pop stick to each cup and freeze until set. Run under hot water to remove from cup or mould.

Adapted from livelighter.com.au

 

Frozen yogurt layer cake

Frozen yoghurt layer cake

Takes 15min

Serves 12-16

Ingredients

· 250 g strawberries

· 16 tablespoons natural yogurt

· 250 g banana

· 250 g raspberries

· 250 g blueberries

· 250g blackberries or cherries

Method

Line a loaf tin with cling film. In a blender or food processor, blitz the strawberries with 4 tablespoons of yogurt. Pour the fruit mixture into the tin and place in the … read more »

Magnesium- what is it and how can I get enough in my diet?

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

What is Magnesium?

  • Magnesium is a mineral that you need every day for good health.
  • Magnesium helps you take energy from food and make new proteins.
  • It is also an important part of your bones, and helps keep your muscles and nerves healthy.
  • Some people find that magnesium-rich foods or supplements help to reduce their cramping and muscle soreness.
  • The best sources of magnesium are legumes, nuts, seeds, fish and whole grains.

 

How much Magnesium should I aim for?

Daily target

Men 19-30yrs

330mg

Men 30+yrs

350mg

Women 19-30yrs

255mg

Women 30+yrs

265mg

** Magnesium from supplements should not exceed 350 mg per day. It is safe to consume more than your daily magnesium needs from food.

 

How can I get enough Magnesium without taking supplements?

The following table shows you which foods are good sources of Magnesium.

Food

Serving size

Magnesium (mg)

All bran

30g

83

 

Almonds

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1⁄4 cup

 

123

 

Banana

 

1 med

 

25

 

Brazil nuts

page2image18416

1⁄4 cup

 

116

Brown rice

 

1 cup

page2image23672

86

Cashews

1⁄4 cup

83

 

Dark chocolate

page2image29200

40g

 

48

Firm tofu

 

150g

page2image34376

112

Greek yogurt

175g

28

Hazelnuts

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1⁄4 cup

53

Kale, cooked

read more »

Cassandra Stuchbery

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Cassie is a people-focused Dietitian who has a strong passion for all things food and nutrition. She is an Accredited Practising Dietitian and Accredited Nutritionist with a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics. Cassie is also a NDIS approved provider.

With a background in chronic disease and weight management Cassie enjoys helping and motivating clients with tailored nutrition programs. She also works providing sports nutrition advice to the Australian Sports Climbing team and regularly presents to young athletes.

Cassie is passionate about helping you make lasting changes to have a long term impact on your health, no fad diets or temporary solutions!

 … read more »

Heart Health and Cholesterol Management

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Eating a healthy diet can reduce your risk of heart disease. If you have high cholesterol levels you can improve them by following a healthy eating pattern.

What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a fatty substance found in the blood that is made by the liver. A small amount of cholesterol in the blood is important for health; however, high cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for heart disease.

LDL-cholesterol (Low Density Lipoprotein) – known as the ‘bad’ cholesterol. It is deposited in the walls of the blood vessels causing blockages. High LDL-cholesterol levels in your blood increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.

J HDL-cholesterol (High Density Lipoprotein) – is known as the ‘good’ cholesterol. HDL carries cholesterol away from the blood vessels back to the liver to be reused by the body. If your HDL-cholesterol level is high, this will help reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.

L Triglycerides are fatty substances found in your blood that are made from the fats and sugars found in food and drinks. Triglycerides can be used by your body for energy, but if there are more triglycerides produced than the body needs they are … read more »

Diabetes Management

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (sugar) in the blood.

Glucose is the main source of energy for the body and comes from carbohydrate foods we eat. Carbohydrate foods include bread, pasta, rice, cereals, fruits, starchy vegetables, legumes, and milk and yoghurt. The body breaks carbohydrates down to glucose which then enters the blood stream. For glucose to enter the cells and be used for energy, a hormone called insulin must be available.

Diabetes occurs when the body does not make insulin or when the insulin that is made is not working properly. This leads to increased blood glucose levels and diabetes.

Learning how to manage your diabetes will help you feel better and help to prevent health complications caused by high blood glucose levels. Healthy eating and knowing how food affects your blood glucose levels plays an essential role in you managing your diabetes.

What should I eat?

A healthy diet for diabetes includes the right balance of carbohydrate, protein, and fat.

To help manage your diabetes, your meals should be:

  • An appropriate size – not too large
  • Regular and spread evenly throughout the day
  • Lower in fat, particularly saturated fat
  • Based
read more »

Nutrition and healthy eating for a new Mum

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

The arrival of your new baby is extremely exciting and stressful as it requires you to make a lot of adjustments. It is common that new mums and dads experience appetite disturbances, where they may feel disinterested in food. This is often caused by sleep disturbances.

Your diet gives you the energy you need during the day and keeps your body nourished so that it runs at its peak. Five small meals a day is recommended, but if you are finding it difficult to fit everything in as well as taking care of your new born, make sure you are eating at least three meals daily. This is important to ensure you get all the nutrients you need to recover from the birth as well as helping you make milk if you are breastfeeding.

We advise the following to ensure you maintain a nutritious and healthy diet.

  • Eat a variety of different coloured fruit and vegetables daily.  These provide vitamins and minerals for your immune system and overall health.
  • Eat plenty of breads and cereals which include wholegrains, rice and pasta for energy.
  • Eat protein every day including meat, chicken, fish, eggs and cheese. Protein helps to repair tissues and
read more »

Emma Morris

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Emma Morris is a highly qualified and experienced Dietitian and Sports Dietitian. She has a Bachelor of Applied Science in Human Movement as well as a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics.

As well as practicing full time at Stay Tuned Sports Medicine, Emma is also the Dietitian for Williamstown Football Club and regularly presents to a variety of sporting clubs.

Emma will help you get off the dieting merry-go-round and assist you to make changes that will stay with you over your lifetime.… read more »