Magnesium- what is it and how can I get enough in my diet?

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

What is Magnesium?

  • Magnesium is a mineral that you need every day for good health.
  • Magnesium helps you take energy from food and make new proteins.
  • It is also an important part of your bones, and helps keep your muscles and nerves healthy.
  • Some people find that magnesium-rich foods or supplements help to reduce their cramping and muscle soreness.
  • The best sources of magnesium are legumes, nuts, seeds, fish and whole grains.

 

How much Magnesium should I aim for?

Daily target

Men 19-30yrs

330mg

Men 30+yrs

350mg

Women 19-30yrs

255mg

Women 30+yrs

265mg

** Magnesium from supplements should not exceed 350 mg per day. It is safe to consume more than your daily magnesium needs from food.

 

How can I get enough Magnesium without taking supplements?

The following table shows you which foods are good sources of Magnesium.

Food

Serving size

Magnesium (mg)

All bran

30g

83

 

Almonds

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1⁄4 cup

 

123

 

Banana

 

1 med

 

25

 

Brazil nuts

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1⁄4 cup

 

116

Brown rice

 

1 cup

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86

Cashews

1⁄4 cup

83

 

Dark chocolate

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40g

 

48

Firm tofu

 

150g

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112

Greek yogurt

175g

28

Hazelnuts

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1⁄4 cup

53

Kale, cooked

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Cassandra Stuchbery

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Cassie is a people-focused dietitian with a passion for all things food and nutrition. She is an Accredited Practising Dietitian and Accredited Nutritionist with a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics.

 

With a background in chronic disease and weight management Cassie enjoys helping clients with tailored nutrition programs and motivation. She also works providing sports nutrition advice to the Australian Sports Climbing team and regularly presents to young athletes.

 

No more fad diets or temporary solutions, Cassie is passionate about helping you make lasting changes to have a lasting impact on your health.

“Every Body Deserves to Feel Good”read more »

Emma Morris

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Emma Morris is a highly qualified and experienced Dietitian and Sports Dietitian. She has a Bachelor of Applied Science in Human Movement as well as a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics.

As well as practicing full time at Stay Tuned Sports Medicine, Emma is also the Dietitian for Williamstown Football Club and regularly presents to a variety of sporting clubs.

Emma will help you get off the dieting merry-go-round and assist you to make changes that will stay with you over your lifetime.… read more »

Vitamin D

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Vitamin DVitamin D is a group of fat-soluble secosteroids. In humans, vitamin D is unique because it can be ingested and because the body can also synthesize it (from cholesterol) when sun exposure is adequate (hence its nickname, the “sunshine vitamin”).

Although vitamin D is commonly called a vitamin, it is not actually an essential dietary vitamin in the strict sense, as it can be synthesized in adequate amounts by all mammals from sunlight. An organic chemical compound (or related set of compounds) is only scientifically called a vitamin when it cannot be synthesized in sufficient quantities by an organism, and must be obtained from the diet. However, as with other compounds commonly called vitamins, vitamin D was discovered in an effort to find the dietary substance that was lacking in a disease, namely, rickets the childhood form of osteomalacia. Additionally, like other compounds called vitamins, in the developed world vitamin D is added to staple foods, such as milk, to avoid disease due to deficiency.

Vitamin D exists in two forms.

Sources of Vitamin D
Vitamin D2 is obtained from the UV irradiation of the yeast sterol ergosterol and is found naturally in sun-exposed mushrooms. Human beings do not make vitamin D2.

Humans synthesize … read more »