Cold Therapy and Breathing Our Way To Less Stress

by (Osteopath)

Cold Therapy & Breathing Our Way To Less Stress!

Cold TherapyWith the global covid-19 pandemic taking the forefront of our lives this year, we can see the implications that an increased stress can take on our health, relationships and many other facets of our lives. Many of us manage try to manage our stress differently, from walking more, working out more or taking up meditation and mindfulness practices to name a few.

I came across a man named Wim Hof a year ago, a Dutch man nicknamed “The Iceman” who is known for breaking a number of records related to cold exposure including climbing Mt Kilamanjaro in shorts, running a half marathon above the Artic Circle barefoot, and standing in a container while covered with ice cubes for 112 minutes.

Wim has made it his mission to share his learned methods, “The Wim Hof Method” to the rest of the world to enable you to take control of your thoughts, emotions and your body. Built on three fundamental pillars of BREATHING, COMMITMENT and CONTROLLED EXPOSURE TO COLD.

The breathing method in itself will be very beneficial even if you don’t take a cold shower, as it helps to regulate the body. … read more »

Hydrotherapy: workout in water!

by (Physiotherapist)

HYDROTHERAPY: Water As A Workout!

And you don’t need to be able to swim!

Research is consistently showing hydrotherapy, or aquatic exercise, to be as effective as land-based exercise in reducing pain and improving function [3][7]. It’s no wonder that hydrotherapy has been used as a treatment modality for hundreds of years!

  • It’s low impact

Great for managing rheumatoid or osteoarthritis, those who have difficulties exercising on land due to impact or pain [4].

  •  Thermotherapy

Relaxes muscles and relives joint stiffness [6].

  • Assists with chronic conditions

Arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia [6].

  • Preparation for or rehabilitation following joint replacement surgery
  • Facilitating recovery from certain strokes and brain injuries

But what really makes hydrotherapy so effective?

THE AMAZING PROPERTIES OF WATER

Buoyancy – The deeper you are submerged in water, the less you weigh. Exercising in water lessens the effects of impact exercise and relieves the joints of much of your bodyweight [1] [5]. Hence, one can tolerate a variety of exercise with better endurance, technique and reduced or no pain.

Heat – Hydrotherapy pools measure around 34°C in temperature, much warmer than your average lap pool! Heat increases circulation through the body, which can relieve muscle tightness and relieve stiffness in … read more »

Diaphragmatic Breathing

by ()

Diaphragmatic Breathing

What is the Diaphragm?

The Diaphragm is the most efficient muscle of breathing. It is a large, dome-shaped muscle located at the base of the lungs. Your abdominal muscles help move the Diaphragm and give you more power to empty your lungs. When you become stressed or anxious, your breathing will become shallower. This means that the Diaphragm will not function as well as it should and the accessory muscles of breathing – which are located in your neck and chest – will do most of the work.

This can leave the Diaphragm weakened and flattened, causing it to work less efficiently, as well as the neck and chest muscles being overworked.

What is Diaphragmatic Breathing?

Diaphragmatic breathing is intended to help you use the Diaphragm correctly while breathing to:

  • Strengthen the Diaphragm
  • Decrease the work of breathing by slowing your breathing rate
  • Decrease oxygen demand
  • Use less effort and energy to breathe
Diaphragmatic Breathing Technique

Lie on your back on a flat surface or in bed, with your knees bent and your head supported. You can use a pillow under your knees to support your legs. Place one hand on your upper chest and the other just

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Progressive Muscle Relaxation

by (Osteopath )

PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION

Now, I want you to release your shoulders from your ears, unclench your jaw and take a deep breath in, and now, out. Did you realise that you were EVEN carrying tension in these areas and, do you know for HOW long you were tensing for? If you answered no to both questions, then Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) may be the perfect tool for you to become more aware of how your body responds to stress, anxiety or fear. PMR is a relaxation sequence of tensing an area of the body for 5 seconds and relaxing for 10 seconds. Like with learning any new skill, the more practice you do, the better you will become at noticing how your muscles react to stress and, most importantly, how to train them to respond differently!

 

Progressive Muscle Relaxation setup

TIPS

  • Tell your muscles to ‘let go’or ‘relax’
  • Schedule practice into your diary!
  • Be comfortable: sit in a supportive chair, wear loose clothing, take your shoes off
  • Minimise distractions: Dim the lights, mute your phone and pop away in another room
  • If you have any physical injuries, please consult a Stay Tuned practitioner or your doctor before beginning

 

PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE read more »

Regan Gardiner

by (Myotherapist)

Regan discovered a love of anatomy whilst studying her Double Diploma of Sports Development – it was at this time that she decided on a career in Myotherapy.

Completing her degree in early 2015 at the Southern School of Natural Therapies, Regan spent time working at Carlton Football as a Myotherapist. Working at the football club exposed her to a range of injuries including muscle strains, sprains and overuse injuries.

In her consults Regan uses a combination of tchniques including soft & deep tissue massage, myofascial release, trigger-point therapy, cupping, dry needling, stretching, joint mobilisation and corrective exercises.

Regan believes that treatment is a two way street – the client needs to be involved in their recovery by completing prescribed exercises, self massage, stretching and therapy aids to assist the treatment plan.read more »