Hydrotherapy: workout in water!

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HYDROTHERAPY: Water As A Workout!

And you don’t need to be able to swim!

Research is consistently showing hydrotherapy, or aquatic exercise, to be as effective as land-based exercise in reducing pain and improving function [3][7]. It’s no wonder that hydrotherapy has been used as a treatment modality for hundreds of years!

  • It’s low impact

Great for managing rheumatoid or osteoarthritis, those who have difficulties exercising on land due to impact or pain [4].

  •  Thermotherapy

Relaxes muscles and relives joint stiffness [6].

  • Assists with chronic conditions

Arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia [6].

  • Preparation for or rehabilitation following joint replacement surgery
  • Facilitating recovery from certain strokes and brain injuries

But what really makes hydrotherapy so effective?

THE AMAZING PROPERTIES OF WATER

Buoyancy – The deeper you are submerged in water, the less you weigh. Exercising in water lessens the effects of impact exercise and relieves the joints of much of your bodyweight [1] [5]. Hence, one can tolerate a variety of exercise with better endurance, technique and reduced or no pain.

Heat – Hydrotherapy pools measure around 34°C in temperature, much warmer than your average lap pool! Heat increases circulation through the body, which can relieve muscle tightness and relieve stiffness in … read more »

My Favourite Exercises

by (Physiotherapist)

My Favourite Exercises!

Exercise is one the most easily prescribed mode of treatment to improve health and wellbeing. There is irrefutable evidence that suggests the beneficial effects of exercise to prevent and treat several diseases. I feel privileged that I am able to use exercise as a form of treatment. In doing so, I always make sure that my client knows what the exercise is, how to do the exercise properly, why we’re doing this exercise and the benefits of the exercise. I always look for exercises where I can get the most benefit, meaning maximizing gains while promoting stability and control. Here are my top three prescribed exercises.

1. Glute Bridges
Personally, I think the gluteals are the most underrated muscle in the body. Some people would prefer bigger chest or back or biceps or triceps. They do not realize that it’s the gluteals that hold everything together. Gluteal muscle strength and endurance play a significant role in injury prevention, normalizing gait pattern and posture, eliminating pain and enhancing athletic performance.

The beauty of performing glute bridges is that unlike any other lower limb or hip exercise, you perform this exercise lying down, knees and feet hip width apart. … read more »

Australian Open Tennis: your personal entourage.

by (Osteopath)

Australian Open Tennis: your personal entourage.

Simon

Just a heads up, a little niggle will likely becomes a big niggle after you have played without a prep.

We have just the team, and if you are a tennis player, we can be your own private entourage prepping you for the big game. ????

I’m Simon and a tennis player myself, I love the game, and did my thesis on tennis, studying all the biomechanics, and then went and did a tennis coaching course to really understand how the game is taught at all levels.

I really enjoy linking all these bases of knowledge to help get the best outcome for my fellow tennis tragics!

read more »

Bursitis

by (Osteopath)

Bursitis? What is that?! 

Have you recently consulted with your Osteo or Physio who has referred you for an ultrasound? Did they mentioned the possibility that you have Bursitis? Well let me explain a bit about what that is!

Healthy vs BursitisWhat is a Bursa?

A Bursa is a fluid filled sac that acts as a cushion between muscles, tendons, joints and bones. The role of these Bursae is to reduce friction caused by movement around those joints. 

What is Bursitis?

Bursitis is inflammation of the Bursae. It is often a painful condition that affects the joints. It is commonly associated with over use or repetitive joint movements. It can however also be caused by poor postures, walking habits, long standing strength or structural imbalances. It is more common in those who are overweight, have some types of arthritis, elderly or diabetic, however it can also occur in healthy individuals. 

Common sites of Bursitis are: 

  • Shoulder 
  • Hip 
  • Knee 
  • Elbow 
  • Ankle 

Symptoms of Bursitis:

  • Pain or tenderness around the joint, especially if pressure is applied. 
  • Redness, warmth or swelling are usually uncommon but may be a sign of infection. 

Diagnosis of Bursitis:

A diagnosis of Bursitis is usually done through a thorough examination. … read more »

Ankle Sprains

by (Osteopath )

Ankle Sprains 

Ashby Smith

Ankle sprains are the most common lower limb injury for sports people and have the highest re-injury rate of all sports injuries.

When we recover from ankle sprains and injuries we need to make sure that our exercise rehabilitation is comprehensive and properly strengthens the ankle before we get back to sport.

Here are the 5 stages of ankle recovery and 3 exercises/management tools you can do in each stage!

 

Stage 1: Regain range of motion.

  • Gentle calf stretches
  • Massage therapy to the lower leg
  • Elevating and compressing your leg up to reduce the swelling – which helps to restore range of motion

Stage 2: Regain balance and proprioception.

  • Single leg balance test
  • Wobble board/bosu ball exercises
  • Arabesques

Stage 3: Strengthen lower leg muscles.

  • Calf raises
  • Ankle up and outs – with theraband
  • Squats

Stage 4: Start sports specific exercises (return to modified training).

  • Skipping
  • Lateral hops
  • Jump squats

Stage 5: Return to sport.

  • Suicides
  • Bunny hops
  • High knee running

read more »

Osteopathy, Fatherhood and Sport.

by (Osteopath)

As an Osteopath with 3 active under teenage kids, I have the invaluable experience of watching my kids develop physically while playing a number of sports: tennis, swimming, ballet, lacrosse, basketball and nippers.

In fact I’m poolside now at 5.50am in a chilly Melbourne Monday morning. Brrrr!

At 12 years old our eldest boy is swimming more than 30km a week, plus basketball and nippers.

30km! Some would say that’s a lot for a 12 year old, especially considering that my eldest is not in the least bulked up with muscle.

How has he got there?

It’s a progression, a build, to get to this point, and it’s a path that the body has to take to accommodate the wants of its owner. He has had some aches and pains and they will always happen when loading the body, but he has never had a major injury and there are a couple of reasons for this…

????Management/ treatment of past major issues and the recording or remembering of them. You would not believe how many people forget a broken bone or an operation!

????Then there is the ‘dad, my arm hurts here ????’ scenario, whereby we immediately

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Runners Knee – Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Running. For some of you this is an activity that stopped eons ago. A forgotten activity that your body once endured. For others it is part of your daily life, like brushing your teeth or eating breakfast. But for those of you like me, your relationship with running is not so black and white.  Your running routine comes in peaks and troughs, dictated by little niggles, aches and sometimes even the seasons. The most common area of complaint in runners that I see here at Stay Tuned is the knee.

The most common cause of knee pain in runners is patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), or runner’s knee. This occurs when the patella, otherwise known as the knee cap does not track within the groove at the end of the femur (thigh bone) properly, creating friction between these structures. Those with PFPS may feel discomfort at the front of the knee when going up or down stairs, squatting, or sitting down with the knees bent for an extended period of time. Unlike other injuries there is not always an obvious cause for the development of this condition, instead there may be multiple factors as to why the patella does not track … read more »

I’ve just had an ACL reconstruction. When can I play again?

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Are you like one of the many Melbournians who ruptured their ACL in 2017?

No? Well you probably know someone who’s going through their rehab or wearing one of those huge knee braces…

A common question I get asked as an osteopath is; “When do you think I’ll be able to get back to running/cricket/footy/netball etc.?”

If there was a clear-cut rehabilitation program which guaranteed a smooth, risk free transition back to sport none of you would be reading this article.

Unfortunately, the gold standard just doesn’t exist yet, however, we are lucky to have access to the newest research.

This give us, your osteopaths and physiotherapists the right information to guide your rehab program and give you the highest chance of success.

 

“So what does the newest research suggest?”

The traditional return-to-sport (RTS) criteria mainly focuses on a time frame period in conjunction with clinical assessments of physical capability. Often you hear those who’ve had their reconstruction saying, “In 12 months I’ll be back, once all the locking, swelling and restrictions are gone.”

The latest research from Burland et al. (2017) is suggesting to take more of an “optimized criterion-based multifactorial return-to-sport approach” (p. 2). A layered … read more »