Bursitis

by (Osteopath)

Bursitis? What is that?! 

Have you recently consulted with your Osteo or Physio who has referred you for an ultrasound? Did they mentioned the possibility that you have Bursitis? Well let me explain a bit about what that is!

Healthy vs BursitisWhat is a Bursa?

A Bursa is a fluid filled sac that acts as a cushion between muscles, tendons, joints and bones. The role of these Bursae is to reduce friction caused by movement around those joints. 

What is Bursitis?

Bursitis is inflammation of the Bursae. It is often a painful condition that affects the joints. It is commonly associated with over use or repetitive joint movements. It can however also be caused by poor postures, walking habits, long standing strength or structural imbalances. It is more common in those who are overweight, have some types of arthritis, elderly or diabetic, however it can also occur in healthy individuals. 

Common sites of Bursitis are: 

  • Shoulder 
  • Hip 
  • Knee 
  • Elbow 
  • Ankle 

Symptoms of Bursitis:

  • Pain or tenderness around the joint, especially if pressure is applied. 
  • Redness, warmth or swelling are usually uncommon but may be a sign of infection. 

Diagnosis of Bursitis:

A diagnosis of Bursitis is usually done through a thorough examination. … read more »

How to Best Provide Ankle Support for Netballers –Kids, Teenagers and Adults 

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Every Saturday you can probably guarantee that a handful of us “lucky” netballers will come away from the courts with “twisted/turned/sprained” ankles.

Why?

Netball is a game that involves an immense amount of dodging and quick turns. Unfortunately, these movements can put pressure on the lateral ligaments of the ankle. If we happen to overdo it and go into too much inversion (rolling in) we can actually sprain these ligaments.

Due to the nature of the healing process, if damaged ligaments will only regain 80% of their original strength. This means that the ligament will always be a little weaker.

What can we do?

Now apart from doing an excellent rehabilitation program to strengthen the surrounding muscles and improving proprioception, the best thing that netballers can do to provide stability while on the court is to tape or brace the ankle.

Taping

On TV you’ll see that the Australian Diamonds and athletes that play in the Suncorp Super Netball League will mostly decide to tape. This is because they have access to trained professionals who know exactly how to tape ankles for the players specific needs.

At the professional level all teams are looking to get an edge. There has … read more »

Runners Knee – Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Running. For some of you this is an activity that stopped eons ago. A forgotten activity that your body once endured. For others it is part of your daily life, like brushing your teeth or eating breakfast. But for those of you like me, your relationship with running is not so black and white.  Your running routine comes in peaks and troughs, dictated by little niggles, aches and sometimes even the seasons. The most common area of complaint in runners that I see here at Stay Tuned is the knee.

The most common cause of knee pain in runners is patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), or runner’s knee. This occurs when the patella, otherwise known as the knee cap does not track within the groove at the end of the femur (thigh bone) properly, creating friction between these structures. Those with PFPS may feel discomfort at the front of the knee when going up or down stairs, squatting, or sitting down with the knees bent for an extended period of time. Unlike other injuries there is not always an obvious cause for the development of this condition, instead there may be multiple factors as to why the patella does not track … read more »

I’ve just had an ACL reconstruction. When can I play again?

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Are you like one of the many Melbournians who ruptured their ACL in 2017?

No? Well you probably know someone who’s going through their rehab or wearing one of those huge knee braces…

A common question I get asked as an osteopath is; “When do you think I’ll be able to get back to running/cricket/footy/netball etc.?”

If there was a clear-cut rehabilitation program which guaranteed a smooth, risk free transition back to sport none of you would be reading this article.

Unfortunately, the gold standard just doesn’t exist yet, however, we are lucky to have access to the newest research.

This give us, your osteopaths and physiotherapists the right information to guide your rehab program and give you the highest chance of success.

 

“So what does the newest research suggest?”

The traditional return-to-sport (RTS) criteria mainly focuses on a time frame period in conjunction with clinical assessments of physical capability. Often you hear those who’ve had their reconstruction saying, “In 12 months I’ll be back, once all the locking, swelling and restrictions are gone.”

The latest research from Burland et al. (2017) is suggesting to take more of an “optimized criterion-based multifactorial return-to-sport approach” (p. 2). A layered … read more »

Shoulder pain – Can I avoid surgery?

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Shoulder AnatomyThere is constant dialogue in regards to effects of surgery verses conservative therapy for the management of many musculoskeletal conditions. One such area is the shoulder. Shoulder pain is common in the general population and is one of, if not the most common cause of upper limb and neck complaints. Shoulder pain can be due to an acute injury such as a torn rotator cuff muscle or fracture, or a chronic condition such as an overuse injury. Additionally, shoulder pain can arise due to dysfunction within the joint itself, or in combination with the actions of the muscles that work around it. It is also important to note that shoulder pain can be attributed to dysfunction or disease in other areas of the body and that it is a combination of these factors that makes treating shoulder pain challenging.

As shoulder impingement is the most common cause of shoulder pain there is plenty of interest in its management, and with this interest, comes research.  Shoulder impingement encompasses an array of shoulder pathology that ultimately lead to pain and dysfunction including bursitis, rotator cuff tears, and tendinopathy. Many studies have been performed to examine the best practice for managing shoulder impingement, read more »

Patrick Lynch

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

After completing a Bachelor of Exercise Science at Griffith University on the Gold Coast, Patrick opted for a change of scenery and completed a Master of Physiotherapy at the University of Sydney. Not ready to give up the city life, and head back to Queensland, Pat chose to move to Melbourne where he works at Stay Tuned Sports Medicine in Elwood.
Before becoming a physiotherapist Patrick was always passionate about the importance of maintaining a balanced lifestyle, having always been active and participating in team and individual sports. Throughout his studies this passion has only grown and he is now keen to help others achieve optimal function and reach their individual goals. With a strong background in exercise prescription Pat is sure to employ this in his rehabilitation programs.
Outside of work Patrick loves to explore what the world, and his doorstep has to offer. He is a keen traveller, either to another country or a good coffee shop or brewery he has heard about. Pat grew up surfing, rowing, playing cricket and the various codes of rugby, although he has recently developed a keen taste for Aussie Rules.… read more »

Dr Josh Osborne

by (Podiatrist)

Josh completed his bachelor of Podiatry at La Trobe Bundoora in 2011. He is a highly enthusiastic Podiatrist and Personal Trainer, having advanced knowledge in sporting injuries and rehabilitation. He has a great deal of experience working alongside physiotherapists within football clubs and within multidisciplinary teams loving the collaborative approach to healthcare.

 

Josh considers himself to be a problem solver who is caring and friendly; “I want the best for my patients and I strongly believe in holistic management”

 

Josh has completed numerous courses including rocktape application, foot mobilisations, and dry needling.

 

Chronic conditions such as Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles tendonopathy are two of his favourite conditions to manage.

“Every Body Deserves to Feel Good”read more »

Fiona Tydde

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Fiona grew up on the sunny shores of Perth where she completed a Bachelor of Science (Physiotherapy) at Curtin University. After graduating in 2010 she moved to Melbourne and completed further qualifications in Clinical Pilates with Dance Medicine Australia as well as Sports and Spinal Dry Needling.

Fiona has worked in private practices across Australia and the UK. She has treated a wide range of Musculoskeletal, Sports and Spinal injuries and has a special interest in women health such as pre and post natal conditions, especially since the birth of her own little boy!

Fiona takes a holistic and personalised approach with every patient and truly believes in the importance of functional rehabilitation for long term results. Fiona strives to help you achieve your goals as quickly as possible. 

In her spare time Fiona enjoys spending time with her young family, yoga and running – she even completed the Paris marathon in 2015!

Fiona works as a Physiotherapist & Group Exercise Rehab Instructor at our Elwood clinic.read more »

Dry Needling – breaking through needle phobia

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

As you may have noticed, dry needling has become increasingly popular over the last 10 years. You may have seen it advertised for use by your physiotherapist, osteopath and myotherapist/remedial massage therapist. But if you’ve walked into the clinic expecting a gentle and relaxing treatment, you may get a surprise when the business end of a sharp needle is suggested to easy your pain. So what is needling, and how can it help you?

Acupuncture needle used for dry needling rehabilitation medical treament for physiotherapy and pain due to physical injury in the hand of the doctor.

Important points

  • Dry needling is not acupuncture
  • It may help relieve myofascial pain
  • It should not feel like a “stab”
  • It is often used with other treatments to address the underlying cause of pain, or limitations as a result of pain

 

Dry needling is not acupuncture, as is frequently asked in our clinic. Although dry needling commonly uses the same needles as acupuncture, it targets very different areas of the body. Acupuncture traditionally is derived from Eastern medicine and basic principles are associated with needling within a “meridian channel” which is associated with the flow of energy throughout the body. The theory works upon the idea that disruption in energy flows through these channels causes pain and illness. Dry needling is an adaptation of acupuncture, … read more »