Hip Flexors causing you back pain?

by (Physiotherapist)
  • Do you feel a dull ache on your lower back that doesn’t really go away with stretching your buttocks or hamstring muscles?
  • Have you been sitting at computer for 6+ hours a day and feel like your lower back is aching?
  • Have you been doing Pilates and feeling strong with all the “core” you’ve been doing but still feeling an ache in your lower back?

If you’ve ticked any of those boxes, then hip flexor stretches may be helpful for you.

The three major hip flexor muscles are Psoas, Iliacus and the Rectus Femoris. The Psoas originates from the side of the spine of your lower back and inserts to your femur or leg bone. The Iliacus is a fan shaped muscle that covers the front of your pelvis and inserts to the same area of your leg or femur. The Rectus Femoris originates from your lower part of your pelvis and comes down to connect to your patella. These three muscles flex or bend the hip forward.

Generally, if a muscle is put in a shortened position for a long time, it will shorten or tighten up. Sitting in front of your computer for many hours a day, five … read more »

Hip Pain. Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

by (Osteopath)

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) may be a hard one to pronounce, but with the right help it isn’t hard to manage. FAI occurs when your hip joint does not form correctly during childhood developmental years. An increase in friction during movement of the hip joint causes abnormalities that are described as either Pincer, Cam or Mixed/Combined (as shown in image 1). In some cases, the hip may be provoked in some way due to the nature of your exercise or even occupation.

Femoroacetabular Impingement

Image 1 adapted from: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases–conditions/femoroacetabular-impingement/

FAI will often present as pain at the front of your hip or groin and you may notice your hip doesn’t move as well is it used to! These symptoms may come about during or following exercise, prolonged sitting and crossing the legs.

The diagnosis of FAI involves a detailed history, physical exam and radiographs of the pelvis. Your age and pre-injury activity level will come into consideration when determining if surgery is indicated or not. These options will first be discussed with your practitioner.

Recent studies have shown that initial conservative management for FAI may improve function and symptoms, so thankfully there are a few things you can do to help yourself get … read more »