Time To Get Proactive!

by (Osteopath )

Time to Get Proactive!

Life is unpredictable and can be chaotic at times. But you don’t have to always let the unexpected get the best of you. The solution is to practice becoming proactive. By choosing to be proactive, you are choosing to take responsibility for your actions by planning ahead. You can be more deliberate with the choices you make instead of reacting to things only when they pop up. When you are reactive, you are forced to deal with situations with less time and limited resources.

The key behaviours that make you proactive include setting short term and long term goals; prioritising what you can control and staying consistent. When you make a habit out of these behaviours, you will be better equipped to tackle almost anything that comes your way. You can more readily identify potential obstacles and then work towards overcoming them before they become serious roadblocks.

So, do the things that future you will thank you for. These things might be like paying your bills early or stretching before you are in pain. Being proactive with your health can mean that you are in a better position to tackle unexpected health events. Ways of being … read more »

Hydrotherapy: workout in water!

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HYDROTHERAPY: Water As A Workout!

And you don’t need to be able to swim!

Research is consistently showing hydrotherapy, or aquatic exercise, to be as effective as land-based exercise in reducing pain and improving function [3][7]. It’s no wonder that hydrotherapy has been used as a treatment modality for hundreds of years!

  • It’s low impact

Great for managing rheumatoid or osteoarthritis, those who have difficulties exercising on land due to impact or pain [4].

  •  Thermotherapy

Relaxes muscles and relives joint stiffness [6].

  • Assists with chronic conditions

Arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia [6].

  • Preparation for or rehabilitation following joint replacement surgery
  • Facilitating recovery from certain strokes and brain injuries

But what really makes hydrotherapy so effective?

THE AMAZING PROPERTIES OF WATER

Buoyancy – The deeper you are submerged in water, the less you weigh. Exercising in water lessens the effects of impact exercise and relieves the joints of much of your bodyweight [1] [5]. Hence, one can tolerate a variety of exercise with better endurance, technique and reduced or no pain.

Heat – Hydrotherapy pools measure around 34°C in temperature, much warmer than your average lap pool! Heat increases circulation through the body, which can relieve muscle tightness and relieve stiffness in … read more »

What is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist and why should I see one?

by (Physiotherapist)

What is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist (AEP) and why should I see one?

Accredited Exercise Physiologists are university qualified allied health professionals equipped with the knowledge and skills to design, deliver and evaluate safe and effective exercise interventions. These can be for people with acute, sub-acute or chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities.

What are the requirements for becoming an AEP?

The requirements for becoming an AEP is to complete a minimum of 4 years university study at both a graduate level and post graduate (Masters) level. AEP’s are also required to complete over 500 hours of placement that gives them exposure not only to the healthy population but also to different conditions such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, neurological, mental health and cancer related conditions.

What is the difference between a Physio and an AEP?

The major difference is that AEP’s are unable to perform any form of manual therapy (hands on) to the client such as mobilisations, massage and manipulations. They can however do assessments similar to Physio’s like range of motion, manual muscle testing and other special tests. The primary mode of treatment of AEP’s is exercise which is more of hands off therapy.

What is the difference read more »

My Favourite Exercises

by (Physiotherapist)

My Favourite Exercises!

Exercise is one the most easily prescribed mode of treatment to improve health and wellbeing. There is irrefutable evidence that suggests the beneficial effects of exercise to prevent and treat several diseases. I feel privileged that I am able to use exercise as a form of treatment. In doing so, I always make sure that my client knows what the exercise is, how to do the exercise properly, why we’re doing this exercise and the benefits of the exercise. I always look for exercises where I can get the most benefit, meaning maximizing gains while promoting stability and control. Here are my top three prescribed exercises.

1. Glute Bridges
Personally, I think the gluteals are the most underrated muscle in the body. Some people would prefer bigger chest or back or biceps or triceps. They do not realize that it’s the gluteals that hold everything together. Gluteal muscle strength and endurance play a significant role in injury prevention, normalizing gait pattern and posture, eliminating pain and enhancing athletic performance.

The beauty of performing glute bridges is that unlike any other lower limb or hip exercise, you perform this exercise lying down, knees and feet hip width apart. … read more »

Bursitis

by (Osteopath)

Bursitis? What is that?! 

Have you recently consulted with your Osteo or Physio who has referred you for an ultrasound? Did they mentioned the possibility that you have Bursitis? Well let me explain a bit about what that is!

Healthy vs BursitisWhat is a Bursa?

A Bursa is a fluid filled sac that acts as a cushion between muscles, tendons, joints and bones. The role of these Bursae is to reduce friction caused by movement around those joints. 

What is Bursitis?

Bursitis is inflammation of the Bursae. It is often a painful condition that affects the joints. It is commonly associated with over use or repetitive joint movements. It can however also be caused by poor postures, walking habits, long standing strength or structural imbalances. It is more common in those who are overweight, have some types of arthritis, elderly or diabetic, however it can also occur in healthy individuals. 

Common sites of Bursitis are: 

  • Shoulder 
  • Hip 
  • Knee 
  • Elbow 
  • Ankle 

Symptoms of Bursitis:

  • Pain or tenderness around the joint, especially if pressure is applied. 
  • Redness, warmth or swelling are usually uncommon but may be a sign of infection. 

Diagnosis of Bursitis:

A diagnosis of Bursitis is usually done through a thorough examination. … read more »

Ankle Sprains

by (Osteopath )

Ankle Sprains 

Ashby Smith

Ankle sprains are the most common lower limb injury for sports people and have the highest re-injury rate of all sports injuries.

When we recover from ankle sprains and injuries we need to make sure that our exercise rehabilitation is comprehensive and properly strengthens the ankle before we get back to sport.

Here are the 5 stages of ankle recovery and 3 exercises/management tools you can do in each stage!

 

Stage 1: Regain range of motion.

  • Gentle calf stretches
  • Massage therapy to the lower leg
  • Elevating and compressing your leg up to reduce the swelling – which helps to restore range of motion

Stage 2: Regain balance and proprioception.

  • Single leg balance test
  • Wobble board/bosu ball exercises
  • Arabesques

Stage 3: Strengthen lower leg muscles.

  • Calf raises
  • Ankle up and outs – with theraband
  • Squats

Stage 4: Start sports specific exercises (return to modified training).

  • Skipping
  • Lateral hops
  • Jump squats

Stage 5: Return to sport.

  • Suicides
  • Bunny hops
  • High knee running

read more »

How to Best Provide Ankle Support for Netballers –Kids, Teenagers and Adults 

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Every Saturday you can probably guarantee that a handful of us “lucky” netballers will come away from the courts with “twisted/turned/sprained” ankles.

Why?

Netball is a game that involves an immense amount of dodging and quick turns. Unfortunately, these movements can put pressure on the lateral ligaments of the ankle. If we happen to overdo it and go into too much inversion (rolling in) we can actually sprain these ligaments.

Due to the nature of the healing process, if damaged ligaments will only regain 80% of their original strength. This means that the ligament will always be a little weaker.

What can we do?

Now apart from doing an excellent rehabilitation program to strengthen the surrounding muscles and improving proprioception, the best thing that netballers can do to provide stability while on the court is to tape or brace the ankle.

Taping

On TV you’ll see that the Australian Diamonds and athletes that play in the Suncorp Super Netball League will mostly decide to tape. This is because they have access to trained professionals who know exactly how to tape ankles for the players specific needs.

At the professional level all teams are looking to get an edge. There has … read more »

Don’t ignore heel pain in young athletes.

by (Osteopath)

Is your young sports star suffering heel pain? Let me tell you, they are not alone. Heel pain in young growing active individuals is usually due to a condition medically known as “Severs Disease”. Although it sounds quite dramatic it is very common benign condition affecting active (boys usually) between the ages of 8 – 14. It is caused by an irritation of the growth plate of the heel bone brought on by recent an increased pull from the Achilles tendon. When your child is growing, it is usually the bones that start to grow first, leaving behind the muscles and tendons to adapt and catch up. This leads to the tendons pulling at the insertion site at the heel.

What are the symptoms?

  • Pain around the perimeter of the heel during physical exercise – particularly activities involving lots of jumping and running
  • Pain becomes worse at the BEGINNING and AFTER exercise
  • Changes in the way your child walks – walking on toes is common
  • Swelling, redness or tenderness around the back of the heel

How can we help?

The good news is, there are lots of effective ways to help your child throughout their active lifestyle during this stage. … read more »

Patrick Lynch

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

After completing a Bachelor of Exercise Science at Griffith University on the Gold Coast, Patrick opted for a change of scenery and completed a Master of Physiotherapy at the University of Sydney. Not ready to give up the city life, and head back to Queensland, Pat chose to move to Melbourne where he works at Stay Tuned Sports Medicine in Elwood.
Before becoming a physiotherapist Patrick was always passionate about the importance of maintaining a balanced lifestyle, having always been active and participating in team and individual sports. Throughout his studies this passion has only grown and he is now keen to help others achieve optimal function and reach their individual goals. With a strong background in exercise prescription Pat is sure to employ this in his rehabilitation programs.
Outside of work Patrick loves to explore what the world, and his doorstep has to offer. He is a keen traveller, either to another country or a good coffee shop or brewery he has heard about. Pat grew up surfing, rowing, playing cricket and the various codes of rugby, although he has recently developed a keen taste for Aussie Rules.… read more »

Cassandra Stuchbery

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Cassie is a people-focused Dietitian who has a strong passion for all things food and nutrition. She is an Accredited Practising Dietitian and Accredited Nutritionist with a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics. Cassie is also a NDIS approved provider.

With a background in chronic disease and weight management Cassie enjoys helping and motivating clients with tailored nutrition programs. She also works providing sports nutrition advice to the Australian Sports Climbing team and regularly presents to young athletes.

Cassie is passionate about helping you make lasting changes to have a long term impact on your health, no fad diets or temporary solutions!

 … read more »