Fiona Tydde

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Fiona grew up on the sunny shores of Perth where she completed a Bachelor of Science (Physiotherapy) at Curtin University. After graduating in 2010 she moved to Melbourne and completed further qualifications in Clinical Pilates with Dance Medicine Australia as well as Sports and Spinal Dry Needling.

Fiona has worked in private practices across Australia and the UK. She has treated a wide range of Musculoskeletal, Sports and Spinal injuries and has a special interest in women health such as pre and post natal conditions, especially since the birth of her own little boy!

Fiona takes a holistic and personalised approach with every patient and truly believes in the importance of functional rehabilitation for long term results. Fiona strives to help you achieve your goals as quickly as possible. 

In her spare time Fiona enjoys spending time with her young family, yoga and running – she even completed the Paris marathon in 2015!

Fiona works as a Physiotherapist & Group Exercise Rehab Instructor at our Elwood clinic.read more »

The Full Body Breath – Exercise and Benefits to your Health

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Breathing should involve the whole body, particularly the abdominal and thoracic cavities, but it is not uncommon for people, especially with chronic health issues, to not breathe efficiently using the correct body mechanics, often using some parts of the body whilst not using others.

The diaphragm, situated between the thoracic and abdominal cavities, is a key structure involved in breathing.  It has connections internally through the fascia above the base of the skull and can influence head and neck function (and help clear the mind and head).  It has a link to the neck through its nerve supply.  When functioning efficiently, it helps promote healthy spinal and organ movement and the flow of lymphatic/fluid from/to all areas of the body.

It is your internal personal masseur for your internal organs because when it ascends and descends throughout its range, it supports and massages structures above and below, contributing to healthy heart, lung and digestive function and also through pressure gradients between the thoracic cage and abdomen and (when coordinated with synchronous sacral rocking) will also influence urinary and reproductive organ function.  If the diaphragm moves several centimeters (and contributes also to a few millimeters of sacral rocking movement) with every … read more »

Kate Wines

by (Osteopath)

Dr Kate Wines is a highly motivated Osteopath and Personal Trainer with a great deal of personal experience in sport and exercise rehabilitation. She holds certificates III and IV in Fitness and Personal Training as well as her Masters in Health Science (Osteo) having studied, ‘The cause and occupational risk factors associated with lower back injuries to the Victorian Police Force’.

Following her masters study, Kate was employed by Victoria Police as an Injury Management Consultant, which she continues to perform. Kate also looks after workplace injuries through our Occupational Restoration Program.

In more recent times, Kate studied a post graduate certificate in Manual therapy for Infants, now having a further interest in children, being a mother herself.

Dr Wines also understands the needs of all levels of athletes and those of us trying to get fit, having played ‘A’ grade softball for over 10 years, working with the Tasmanian Cricket Team and Victorian Softball Team, and her work as a personal trainer. She is well placed to help you recover quickly from your injury or to assist you in becoming your personal best.read more »

Paul Hermann

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Stay Tuned’s founder Dr Paul Hermann believes whole heartedly in the company’s motto, Everybody Deserves to Feel Good. He believes it is our responsibility, and privilege to help everyone we interact with, to feel as good as possible.

Whilst studying Osteopathy, Paul completed his Masters research studying the ‘Effectiveness of Swiss Ball Training on Lower Back Stability’, before authoring the popular book ‘Effective Swiss Ball Training’. Paul thirst for knowledge, and to find more ways for people to “feel good”, lead him to additionally complete a Masters in Exercise Science.

As a therapist he has applied this principle to his clinical work with patients. As a lecturer, teaching Exercise Science and Rehabilitation at RMIT and Victoria University, and international presenter he has been able to pass on this principle to many thousands of students and other allied health practitioners and Doctors.

Paul continues to share his passion through his work in the Stay Tuned clinics, mentoring many practitioners, writing Health and Fitness related articles and travelling internationally to lecture and look after a variety of professional athletes and teams.

Paul works as an Osteopath & Exercise Scientist at both Boronia and Elwood clinics.… read more »

Back Breaking News for Cricket Players

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Lower back pain in cricket… what should I look out for?

Lower back pain is a common problem in cricketers due to the demands on the spine from bowling, batting and fielding. Pain caused by spinal structures may be experienced as sharp or dull pain in the back, buttock or legs. Pain intensity may be mild, moderate or severe. When the spinal cord or spinal nerves are implicated nerve pain may also be experienced. Injury can be caused by acute trauma or by repetitive stress over time.

There are many different pain producing structures in the spine including bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, discs and neural tissue. This article will take a closer look at vertebral stress injuries to help you understand what they are, how this injury would implicate your cricket and how to address risk factors to prevent such an injury.

What is a vertebral stress injury? And what does it mean for me and my cricket?

Back PainVertebral stress injuries are caused by repetitive loading to the boney (vertebral) structures in the spine they result from a failing of the vertebral arch. If stress injuries develop on both sides of the vertebra then this can cause an unstable segment … read more »