10 ways to make your ACL rehab easier!

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10 ways to make your ACL rehab easier!

Having an ACL reconstruction is never going to be easy, having gone through one myself in 2017 I can tell you it’s no walk in the park. However, there are ways to make life a bit more bearable – especially in the first few weeks. Ashby

1) Get a plastic chair for the shower

This might sound silly but after your surgery you’ll experience a significant feeling of instability, and the last thing you need is a slippery shower floor increasing that unstable feeling.
I found that putting a plastic chair in the shower is an easy way to feel safe in the shower during those first two to three weeks while you work on getting your knee nice and stable.

2) Change up your theraband position for leg extensions at home

If you’re working on waking up that pesky VMO at home. You’re most likely doing some form of leg extensions. A common form of this are sitting down using a theraband. Now what can commonly happen (and what happened to me) is that the theraband slides up the leg, which can be annoying and uncomfortable. However, if you twist the theraband … read more »

I’ve just had an ACL reconstruction. When can I play again?

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Are you like one of the many Melbournians who ruptured their ACL in 2017?

No? Well you probably know someone who’s going through their rehab or wearing one of those huge knee braces…

A common question I get asked as an osteopath is; “When do you think I’ll be able to get back to running/cricket/footy/netball etc.?”

If there was a clear-cut rehabilitation program which guaranteed a smooth, risk free transition back to sport none of you would be reading this article.

Unfortunately, the gold standard just doesn’t exist yet, however, we are lucky to have access to the newest research.

This give us, your osteopaths and physiotherapists the right information to guide your rehab program and give you the highest chance of success.

 

“So what does the newest research suggest?”

The traditional return-to-sport (RTS) criteria mainly focuses on a time frame period in conjunction with clinical assessments of physical capability. Often you hear those who’ve had their reconstruction saying, “In 12 months I’ll be back, once all the locking, swelling and restrictions are gone.”

The latest research from Burland et al. (2017) is suggesting to take more of an “optimized criterion-based multifactorial return-to-sport approach” (p. 2). A layered … read more »