Time To Get Proactive!

by (Osteopath )

Time to Get Proactive!

Life is unpredictable and can be chaotic at times. But you don’t have to always let the unexpected get the best of you. The solution is to practice becoming proactive. By choosing to be proactive, you are choosing to take responsibility for your actions by planning ahead. You can be more deliberate with the choices you make instead of reacting to things only when they pop up. When you are reactive, you are forced to deal with situations with less time and limited resources.

The key behaviours that make you proactive include setting short term and long term goals; prioritising what you can control and staying consistent. When you make a habit out of these behaviours, you will be better equipped to tackle almost anything that comes your way. You can more readily identify potential obstacles and then work towards overcoming them before they become serious roadblocks.

So, do the things that future you will thank you for. These things might be like paying your bills early or stretching before you are in pain. Being proactive with your health can mean that you are in a better position to tackle unexpected health events. Ways of being … read more »

What is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist and why should I see one?

by (Physiotherapist)

What is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist (AEP) and why should I see one?

Accredited Exercise Physiologists are university qualified allied health professionals equipped with the knowledge and skills to design, deliver and evaluate safe and effective exercise interventions. These can be for people with acute, sub-acute or chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities.

What are the requirements for becoming an AEP?

The requirements for becoming an AEP is to complete a minimum of 4 years university study at both a graduate level and post graduate (Masters) level. AEP’s are also required to complete over 500 hours of placement that gives them exposure not only to the healthy population but also to different conditions such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, neurological, mental health and cancer related conditions.

What is the difference between a Physio and an AEP?

The major difference is that AEP’s are unable to perform any form of manual therapy (hands on) to the client such as mobilisations, massage and manipulations. They can however do assessments similar to Physio’s like range of motion, manual muscle testing and other special tests. The primary mode of treatment of AEP’s is exercise which is more of hands off therapy.

What is the difference read more »

My Favourite Exercises

by (Physiotherapist)

My Favourite Exercises!

Exercise is one the most easily prescribed mode of treatment to improve health and wellbeing. There is irrefutable evidence that suggests the beneficial effects of exercise to prevent and treat several diseases. I feel privileged that I am able to use exercise as a form of treatment. In doing so, I always make sure that my client knows what the exercise is, how to do the exercise properly, why we’re doing this exercise and the benefits of the exercise. I always look for exercises where I can get the most benefit, meaning maximizing gains while promoting stability and control. Here are my top three prescribed exercises.

1. Glute Bridges
Personally, I think the gluteals are the most underrated muscle in the body. Some people would prefer bigger chest or back or biceps or triceps. They do not realize that it’s the gluteals that hold everything together. Gluteal muscle strength and endurance play a significant role in injury prevention, normalizing gait pattern and posture, eliminating pain and enhancing athletic performance.

The beauty of performing glute bridges is that unlike any other lower limb or hip exercise, you perform this exercise lying down, knees and feet hip width apart. … read more »

Australian Open Tennis: your personal entourage.

by (Osteopath)

Australian Open Tennis: your personal entourage.

Simon

Just a heads up, a little niggle will likely becomes a big niggle after you have played without a prep.

We have just the team, and if you are a tennis player, we can be your own private entourage prepping you for the big game. ????

I’m Simon and a tennis player myself, I love the game, and did my thesis on tennis, studying all the biomechanics, and then went and did a tennis coaching course to really understand how the game is taught at all levels.

I really enjoy linking all these bases of knowledge to help get the best outcome for my fellow tennis tragics!

read more »

Osteopathy, Fatherhood and Sport.

by (Osteopath)

As an Osteopath with 3 active under teenage kids, I have the invaluable experience of watching my kids develop physically while playing a number of sports: tennis, swimming, ballet, lacrosse, basketball and nippers.

In fact I’m poolside now at 5.50am in a chilly Melbourne Monday morning. Brrrr!

At 12 years old our eldest boy is swimming more than 30km a week, plus basketball and nippers.

30km! Some would say that’s a lot for a 12 year old, especially considering that my eldest is not in the least bulked up with muscle.

How has he got there?

It’s a progression, a build, to get to this point, and it’s a path that the body has to take to accommodate the wants of its owner. He has had some aches and pains and they will always happen when loading the body, but he has never had a major injury and there are a couple of reasons for this…

????Management/ treatment of past major issues and the recording or remembering of them. You would not believe how many people forget a broken bone or an operation!

????Then there is the ‘dad, my arm hurts here ????’ scenario, whereby we immediately

read more »

Ashby Smith

by (Osteopath )
Ashby graduated from RMIT with a double degree in Health Science and Applied Science in the field of Osteopathy. He has also completed a post-graduate certificate in Dry Needling.
He has had experience working with various local Aussie rules clubs as well as currently being on the medical team of Volleyball Victoria. ​
In the years leading up to his graduation as an Osteopath, Ashby worked in the fitness industry as an athletic performance coach.
He has a keen interest in helping his clients overcome their injury in order to achieve their goals, no matter how big or small. He uses many manual therapy techniques such as manipulation and soft tissue during treatment, as well as different exercise approaches to effectively and consistently manage his clients issues.​
In his spare time Ashby enjoys getting down to the beach for a surf, and loves having a kick of the footy.
Last year Ashby represented Victoria in open men’s Volleyball.
read more »

Biomechanics of Barefoot Running

by (Podiatrist)

Barefoot RunningThe complex issues that surround barefoot running

For experienced and dedicated runners the barefoot running debate has prompted a lot of discussion. These discussions center around the benefits and risks associated with this new technique.

My definition of bare foot running is: to run barefoot or in a device that provides no support, heel counter and has no shock absorption properties.

There are many shoes that sit between a barefoot running device and a traditional running shoe. These shoes range from Vibrams to Nike frees. Shoes in this range all vary in the effect they will have on your gait. Due to this and the large range of shoes that are currently on the market, I have chosen not to discuss individual shoes here.
In this article I have provided more information about what I believe are the key points to consider related to this issue. They include: foot strike patterns, shock attenuation, training and proprioceptive feed back and how these will effect energy expenditure, injuries and injury rates. In this article I hope to discuss many of these issues in more detail.

Barefoot Running Diagram

Foot strike pattern

The largest visual change between shod and bare foot running is most commonly seen … read more »

Shin Splints

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Shin Splints is a common term for medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). It is an injury caused by overuse and ‘doing too much too soon’. MTSS is the inflammation of the periosteum of the tibia (the sheath surrounding the bone). Individuals doing high impact activities such as running, jumping, netball and football are more prone to this injury.

Not all pain in the anterior lower leg is MTSS; other common lower leg injuries include Anterior Compartment Syndrome, Stress Fracture and Tibalis Anterior Tendonopathy. These can be assessed and diagnosed by your health professional.

Symptoms

  • Pain and tenderness over the medial lower half of the shinbone, usually 3- 12cm up from the ankle.
  • Swelling
  • Pain increases with exercise

So what has caused this injury?

When the muscles are put under more stress than they able to cope with, they lose their ability to shock absorb which therefore, increases stress on the body. Players returning to sport after a period of rest or large increases in training increase the risk of developing this injury. Tight muscles including the gastrocnemius and soleus (calf) muscles can cause tractional forces on the periosteum causing inflammation and pain. Poor foot biomechanics with excessive pronation or supination … read more »