Hydrotherapy: workout in water!

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HYDROTHERAPY: Water As A Workout!

And you don’t need to be able to swim!

Research is consistently showing hydrotherapy, or aquatic exercise, to be as effective as land-based exercise in reducing pain and improving function [3][7]. It’s no wonder that hydrotherapy has been used as a treatment modality for hundreds of years!

  • It’s low impact

Great for managing rheumatoid or osteoarthritis, those who have difficulties exercising on land due to impact or pain [4].

  •  Thermotherapy

Relaxes muscles and relives joint stiffness [6].

  • Assists with chronic conditions

Arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia [6].

  • Preparation for or rehabilitation following joint replacement surgery
  • Facilitating recovery from certain strokes and brain injuries

But what really makes hydrotherapy so effective?

THE AMAZING PROPERTIES OF WATER

Buoyancy – The deeper you are submerged in water, the less you weigh. Exercising in water lessens the effects of impact exercise and relieves the joints of much of your bodyweight [1] [5]. Hence, one can tolerate a variety of exercise with better endurance, technique and reduced or no pain.

Heat – Hydrotherapy pools measure around 34°C in temperature, much warmer than your average lap pool! Heat increases circulation through the body, which can relieve muscle tightness and relieve stiffness in … read more »

ITB Friction Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist)

ITB Friction Syndrome

What is the ITB?

ITB or Iliotibial band is a thick band of fascia or sheet of connective tissue that starts from your hip bone (the ilium) and ends at the outside of your knee. There are two structures that connect to form the ITB and those are the tensor fascia latae (TFL) muscle and the gluteus maximus muscle. The TFL is a hip flexor muscle and the gluteus maximus is a hip extensor muscle. They form and meet at the outside of the thigh to form the ITB and continues down as one band and end on the side of the leg.

What causes ITB Friction Syndrome?

ITB friction syndrome occurs when there is repetitive overuse of the ITB. The friction occurs when the ITB slides over the lateral femoral condyle on the side of the knee.This happens due to a number of reasons mainly running or jumping or the repetitive movements, or an already tight ITB and/or weakness of the hip extensors and abductors.

What are the symptoms?

It presents with symptoms of pain, tenderness and tightness on the side of the thigh and the leg. There may be limitation when it comes to knee … read more »

Australian Open Tennis: your personal entourage.

by (Osteopath)

Australian Open Tennis: your personal entourage.

Simon

Just a heads up, a little niggle will likely becomes a big niggle after you have played without a prep.

We have just the team, and if you are a tennis player, we can be your own private entourage prepping you for the big game. ????

I’m Simon and a tennis player myself, I love the game, and did my thesis on tennis, studying all the biomechanics, and then went and did a tennis coaching course to really understand how the game is taught at all levels.

I really enjoy linking all these bases of knowledge to help get the best outcome for my fellow tennis tragics!

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Bursitis

by (Osteopath)

Bursitis? What is that?! 

Have you recently consulted with your Osteo or Physio who has referred you for an ultrasound? Did they mentioned the possibility that you have Bursitis? Well let me explain a bit about what that is!

Healthy vs BursitisWhat is a Bursa?

A Bursa is a fluid filled sac that acts as a cushion between muscles, tendons, joints and bones. The role of these Bursae is to reduce friction caused by movement around those joints. 

What is Bursitis?

Bursitis is inflammation of the Bursae. It is often a painful condition that affects the joints. It is commonly associated with over use or repetitive joint movements. It can however also be caused by poor postures, walking habits, long standing strength or structural imbalances. It is more common in those who are overweight, have some types of arthritis, elderly or diabetic, however it can also occur in healthy individuals. 

Common sites of Bursitis are: 

  • Shoulder 
  • Hip 
  • Knee 
  • Elbow 
  • Ankle 

Symptoms of Bursitis:

  • Pain or tenderness around the joint, especially if pressure is applied. 
  • Redness, warmth or swelling are usually uncommon but may be a sign of infection. 

Diagnosis of Bursitis:

A diagnosis of Bursitis is usually done through a thorough examination. … read more »

Diaphragmatic Breathing

by (Osteopath )

Diaphragmatic Breathing

What is the Diaphragm?

The Diaphragm is the most efficient muscle of breathing. It is a large, dome-shaped muscle located at the base of the lungs. Your abdominal muscles help move the Diaphragm and give you more power to empty your lungs. When you become stressed or anxious, your breathing will become shallower. This means that the Diaphragm will not function as well as it should and the accessory muscles of breathing – which are located in your neck and chest – will do most of the work.

This can leave the Diaphragm weakened and flattened, causing it to work less efficiently, as well as the neck and chest muscles being overworked.

What is Diaphragmatic Breathing?

Diaphragmatic breathing is intended to help you use the Diaphragm correctly while breathing to:

  • Strengthen the Diaphragm
  • Decrease the work of breathing by slowing your breathing rate
  • Decrease oxygen demand
  • Use less effort and energy to breathe
Diaphragmatic Breathing Technique

Lie on your back on a flat surface or in bed, with your knees bent and your head supported. You can use a pillow under your knees to support your legs. Place one hand on your upper chest and the other just

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Osteopathy, Fatherhood and Sport.

by (Osteopath)

As an Osteopath with 3 active under teenage kids, I have the invaluable experience of watching my kids develop physically while playing a number of sports: tennis, swimming, ballet, lacrosse, basketball and nippers.

In fact I’m poolside now at 5.50am in a chilly Melbourne Monday morning. Brrrr!

At 12 years old our eldest boy is swimming more than 30km a week, plus basketball and nippers.

30km! Some would say that’s a lot for a 12 year old, especially considering that my eldest is not in the least bulked up with muscle.

How has he got there?

It’s a progression, a build, to get to this point, and it’s a path that the body has to take to accommodate the wants of its owner. He has had some aches and pains and they will always happen when loading the body, but he has never had a major injury and there are a couple of reasons for this…

????Management/ treatment of past major issues and the recording or remembering of them. You would not believe how many people forget a broken bone or an operation!

????Then there is the ‘dad, my arm hurts here ????’ scenario, whereby we immediately

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Tram Tran

by (Osteopath )

Tram is an enthusiastic and conscientious Osteopath who has graduated from RMIT University with a double bachelor’s degree in Health Sciences and Applied Sciences in Osteopathy.

Tram wants to truly understand the extent of how injury impacts upon her patient’s day-to-day life. She firmly believes in working collaboratively with her patients to create achievable goals in order to return them back to their life as soon as possible! Whilst in university, Tram discovered her passion for educating others in neuroscience and therefore, she endeavours to educate her patients regarding their diagnosis and their treatment plan.

Tram will commonly incorporate Dry Needling and Clinical Pilates as part of her treatments.

When not treating, Tram lives with two cats and can be found having a boogie wherever RnB is playing in Melbourne. She is a proud Melburnian who loves to visit cafes, bars, art galleries and anything hidden down a cobblestone laneway.… read more »

Ashby Smith

by (Osteopath )
Ashby graduated from RMIT with a double degree in Health Science and Applied Science in the field of Osteopathy. He has also completed a post-graduate certificate in Dry Needling.
He has had experience working with various local Aussie rules clubs as well as currently being on the medical team of Volleyball Victoria. ​
In the years leading up to his graduation as an Osteopath, Ashby worked in the fitness industry as an athletic performance coach.
He has a keen interest in helping his clients overcome their injury in order to achieve their goals, no matter how big or small. He uses many manual therapy techniques such as manipulation and soft tissue during treatment, as well as different exercise approaches to effectively and consistently manage his clients issues.​
In his spare time Ashby enjoys getting down to the beach for a surf, and loves having a kick of the footy.
Last year Ashby represented Victoria in open men’s Volleyball.
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Dr Josh Osborne

by (Podiatrist)

Josh completed his bachelor of Podiatry at La Trobe Bundoora in 2011. He is a highly enthusiastic Podiatrist and Personal Trainer, having advanced knowledge in sporting injuries and rehabilitation. He has a great deal of experience working alongside physiotherapists within football clubs and within multidisciplinary teams loving the collaborative approach to healthcare.

 

Josh considers himself to be a problem solver who is caring and friendly; “I want the best for my patients and I strongly believe in holistic management”

 

Josh has completed numerous courses including rocktape application, foot mobilisations, and dry needling.

 

Chronic conditions such as Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles tendonopathy are two of his favourite conditions to manage.

“Every Body Deserves to Feel Good”read more »

Regan Gardiner

by (Myotherapist)

Regan discovered a love of anatomy whilst studying her Double Diploma of Sports Development – it was at this time that she decided on a career in Myotherapy.

Completing her degree in early 2015 at the Southern School of Natural Therapies, Regan spent time working at Carlton Football as a Myotherapist. Working at the football club exposed her to a range of injuries including muscle strains, sprains and overuse injuries.

In her consults Regan uses a combination of tchniques including soft & deep tissue massage, myofascial release, trigger-point therapy, cupping, dry needling, stretching, joint mobilisation and corrective exercises.

Regan believes that treatment is a two way street – the client needs to be involved in their recovery by completing prescribed exercises, self massage, stretching and therapy aids to assist the treatment plan.read more »