Diaphragmatic Breathing

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Diaphragmatic Breathing

What is the Diaphragm?

The Diaphragm is the most efficient muscle of breathing. It is a large, dome-shaped muscle located at the base of the lungs. Your abdominal muscles help move the Diaphragm and give you more power to empty your lungs. When you become stressed or anxious, your breathing will become shallower. This means that the Diaphragm will not function as well as it should and the accessory muscles of breathing – which are located in your neck and chest – will do most of the work.

This can leave the Diaphragm weakened and flattened, causing it to work less efficiently, as well as the neck and chest muscles being overworked.

What is Diaphragmatic Breathing?

Diaphragmatic breathing is intended to help you use the Diaphragm correctly while breathing to:

  • Strengthen the Diaphragm
  • Decrease the work of breathing by slowing your breathing rate
  • Decrease oxygen demand
  • Use less effort and energy to breathe
Diaphragmatic Breathing Technique

Lie on your back on a flat surface or in bed, with your knees bent and your head supported. You can use a pillow under your knees to support your legs. Place one hand on your upper chest and the other just

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Osteopathy, Fatherhood and Sport.

by (Osteopath)

As an Osteopath with 3 active under teenage kids, I have the invaluable experience of watching my kids develop physically while playing a number of sports: tennis, swimming, ballet, lacrosse, basketball and nippers.

In fact I’m poolside now at 5.50am in a chilly Melbourne Monday morning. Brrrr!

At 12 years old our eldest boy is swimming more than 30km a week, plus basketball and nippers.

30km! Some would say that’s a lot for a 12 year old, especially considering that my eldest is not in the least bulked up with muscle.

How has he got there?

It’s a progression, a build, to get to this point, and it’s a path that the body has to take to accommodate the wants of its owner. He has had some aches and pains and they will always happen when loading the body, but he has never had a major injury and there are a couple of reasons for this…

🔹Management/ treatment of past major issues and the recording or remembering of them. You would not believe how many people forget a broken bone or an operation!

🔹Then there is the ‘dad, my arm hurts here 👇’ scenario, whereby we immediately

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Tram Tran

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Tram is an enthusiastic and conscientious Osteopath who has graduated from RMIT University with a double bachelor’s degree in Health Sciences and Applied Sciences in Osteopathy.

Tram wants to truly understand the extent of how injury impacts upon her patient’s day-to-day life. She firmly believes in working collaboratively with her patients to create achievable goals in order to return them back to their life as soon as possible! Whilst in university, Tram discovered her passion for educating others in neuroscience and therefore, she endeavours to educate her patients regarding their diagnosis and their treatment plan.

Tram will commonly incorporate Dry Needling and Clinical Pilates as part of her treatments.

When not treating, Tram lives with two cats and can be found having a boogie wherever RnB is playing in Melbourne. She is a proud Melburnian who loves to visit cafes, bars, art galleries and anything hidden down a cobblestone laneway.… read more »

Ashby Smith

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)
Ashby graduated from RMIT with a double degree in Health Science and Applied Science in the field of Osteopathy. He has also completed a post-graduate certificate in Dry Needling.
He has had experience working with various local Aussie rules clubs as well as currently being on the medical team of Volleyball Victoria. ​
In the years leading up to his graduation as an Osteopath, Ashby worked in the fitness industry as an athletic performance coach.
He has a keen interest in helping his clients overcome their injury in order to achieve their goals, no matter how big or small. He uses many manual therapy techniques such as manipulation and soft tissue during treatment, as well as different exercise approaches to effectively and consistently manage his clients issues.​
In his spare time Ashby enjoys getting down to the beach for a surf, and loves having a kick of the footy.
Last year Ashby represented Victoria in open men’s Volleyball.
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Dr Josh Osborne

by (Podiatrist)

Josh completed his bachelor of Podiatry at La Trobe Bundoora in 2011. He is a highly enthusiastic Podiatrist and Personal Trainer, having advanced knowledge in sporting injuries and rehabilitation. He has a great deal of experience working alongside physiotherapists within football clubs and within multidisciplinary teams loving the collaborative approach to healthcare.

 

Josh considers himself to be a problem solver who is caring and friendly; “I want the best for my patients and I strongly believe in holistic management”

 

Josh has completed numerous courses including rocktape application, foot mobilisations, and dry needling.

 

Chronic conditions such as Plantar Fasciitis and Achilles tendonopathy are two of his favourite conditions to manage.

“Every Body Deserves to Feel Good”read more »

Dry Needling – breaking through needle phobia

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

As you may have noticed, dry needling has become increasingly popular over the last 10 years. You may have seen it advertised for use by your physiotherapist, osteopath and myotherapist/remedial massage therapist. But if you’ve walked into the clinic expecting a gentle and relaxing treatment, you may get a surprise when the business end of a sharp needle is suggested to easy your pain. So what is needling, and how can it help you?

Acupuncture needle used for dry needling rehabilitation medical treament for physiotherapy and pain due to physical injury in the hand of the doctor.

Important points

  • Dry needling is not acupuncture
  • It may help relieve myofascial pain
  • It should not feel like a “stab”
  • It is often used with other treatments to address the underlying cause of pain, or limitations as a result of pain

 

Dry needling is not acupuncture, as is frequently asked in our clinic. Although dry needling commonly uses the same needles as acupuncture, it targets very different areas of the body. Acupuncture traditionally is derived from Eastern medicine and basic principles are associated with needling within a “meridian channel” which is associated with the flow of energy throughout the body. The theory works upon the idea that disruption in energy flows through these channels causes pain and illness. Dry needling is an adaptation of acupuncture, … read more »

Regan Gardiner

by (Myotherapist)

Regan discovered a love of anatomy whilst studying her Double Diploma of Sports Development – it was at this time that she decided on a career in Myotherapy.

Completing her degree in early 2015 at the Southern School of Natural Therapies, Regan spent time working at Carlton Football as a Myotherapist. Working at the football club exposed her to a range of injuries including muscle strains, sprains and overuse injuries.

In her consults Regan uses a combination of tchniques including soft & deep tissue massage, myofascial release, trigger-point therapy, cupping, dry needling, stretching, joint mobilisation and corrective exercises.

Regan believes that treatment is a two way street – the client needs to be involved in their recovery by completing prescribed exercises, self massage, stretching and therapy aids to assist the treatment plan.read more »

Simon Duncan

by (Osteopath)

Upon graduation from the European School of Osteopathy (UK) in 1999, with a B.Sc. (hons) in Osteopathy and Diploma in Osteopathy, Simon moved to Milan, Italy searching further challenges.

Although his patient list was primarily sedentary or manufacturing industry workers, his experience includes regularly treating some of Europe’s most elite ballerinas, contemporary dancers and maestri at La Scala, Milano and Studio Danza Insieme, professional tennis and basketball players, and elite level gymnasts.

Simon’s treatment success lies in the combining of tried and tested techniques with the creation of techniques developed for the actual presenting problem, not dividing, but integrating musculoskeletal, visceral and cranial body systems.

Simon firmly believes in treating the sapling so the tree grows straight, and so has been treating and helping infants for many years, especially his 3 young children who are his best advertisements.

While running a successful practice and, gaining 14 years of experience in teaching & clinical roles at the International College of Osteopathic Education, he completed a pitch-side medical assistance course in Scotland and an advanced course in Sports Osteopathy with the University of Bicocca Milan. Over the years, Simon has organised either the osteopathic services or the full medical services at the read more »

Compartment Syndrome

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Compartment syndrome in the lower limb is essentially where the pressure within a compartment increases to a point where the nutrients supplying the structures within that compartment are either completely or partially occluded.

In our lower leg with have 4 compartments; Anterior, Lateral, Deep Posterior and Superficial Posterior. Within each compartment there are specific muscles and neurovascular structures which are contained. These groups of muscles are enclosed within a fascia which is like tight sheet. As well as bundling the muscles together the fascia has the function of providing an element of compression around these muscles.

When we exercise our muscles receive increased blood flow, which cause them to expand, however the fascia remains quite rigid. In most individuals this isn’t a concern as the compartments have enough space for this expansion and contraction to occur. In a symptomatic individual, the muscles expand to a point that blood flow to the area is severely compromised and therefore pressure in the compartment increases. Compartment syndrome typically effects the calf or shin region.

The main contributing factors for compartment syndrome are:

1. Overload of training / Poor variability within training schedules – The below examples can facilitate the onset or progression of … read more »

Benefits of Hydrotherapy

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Who can do hydrotherapy? You.

Hydrotherapy is derived from the Greek words “hydro” meaning water and “therapia” meaning healing, and this form of therapeutic rehabilitation is a particularly useful mode of exercise treatment for many conditions.

Don’t worry; you don’t have to be able to swim (or have to get your hair wet) to gain the benefits from hydrotherapy. Each session is modified to the individual and is based on the condition, stage of rehab and the therapeutic goals set together with the treating practitioner.

Hydrotherapy sessions are taken in thermo-neutral water- this is water heated between 32-36degrees. It is highly beneficial as it is warm to the touch to help relieve pain and muscle spasm whilst at the same time increasing blood supply to the skin without having an effect on core temperature.

The buoyancy of the water unloads the weight of the body allowing minimal loading on the joints, gaining ease of movement and gives the space to focus on quality and control of the movement. Improvement in balance and proprioception is seen alongside strengthening of weak muscles.

Hydrotherapy is useful for:

  • Low risk pregnancies
  • Musculoskeletal problems, particularly where swelling is present
  • Conditions where land-based exercise causes pain
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