Diaphragmatic Breathing

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Diaphragmatic Breathing

What is the Diaphragm?

The Diaphragm is the most efficient muscle of breathing. It is a large, dome-shaped muscle located at the base of the lungs. Your abdominal muscles help move the Diaphragm and give you more power to empty your lungs. When you become stressed or anxious, your breathing will become shallower. This means that the Diaphragm will not function as well as it should and the accessory muscles of breathing – which are located in your neck and chest – will do most of the work.

This can leave the Diaphragm weakened and flattened, causing it to work less efficiently, as well as the neck and chest muscles being overworked.

What is Diaphragmatic Breathing?

Diaphragmatic breathing is intended to help you use the Diaphragm correctly while breathing to:

  • Strengthen the Diaphragm
  • Decrease the work of breathing by slowing your breathing rate
  • Decrease oxygen demand
  • Use less effort and energy to breathe
Diaphragmatic Breathing Technique

Lie on your back on a flat surface or in bed, with your knees bent and your head supported. You can use a pillow under your knees to support your legs. Place one hand on your upper chest and the other just

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Osteopathy, Fatherhood and Sport.

by (Osteopath)

As an Osteopath with 3 active under teenage kids, I have the invaluable experience of watching my kids develop physically while playing a number of sports: tennis, swimming, ballet, lacrosse, basketball and nippers.

In fact I’m poolside now at 5.50am in a chilly Melbourne Monday morning. Brrrr!

At 12 years old our eldest boy is swimming more than 30km a week, plus basketball and nippers.

30km! Some would say that’s a lot for a 12 year old, especially considering that my eldest is not in the least bulked up with muscle.

How has he got there?

It’s a progression, a build, to get to this point, and it’s a path that the body has to take to accommodate the wants of its owner. He has had some aches and pains and they will always happen when loading the body, but he has never had a major injury and there are a couple of reasons for this…

🔹Management/ treatment of past major issues and the recording or remembering of them. You would not believe how many people forget a broken bone or an operation!

🔹Then there is the ‘dad, my arm hurts here 👇’ scenario, whereby we immediately

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Tram Tran

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Tram is an enthusiastic and conscientious Osteopath who has graduated from RMIT University with a double bachelor’s degree in Health Sciences and Applied Sciences in Osteopathy.

Tram wants to truly understand the extent of how injury impacts upon her patient’s day-to-day life. She firmly believes in working collaboratively with her patients to create achievable goals in order to return them back to their life as soon as possible! Whilst in university, Tram discovered her passion for educating others in neuroscience and therefore, she endeavours to educate her patients regarding their diagnosis and their treatment plan.

Tram will commonly incorporate Dry Needling and Clinical Pilates as part of her treatments.

When not treating, Tram lives with two cats and can be found having a boogie wherever RnB is playing in Melbourne. She is a proud Melburnian who loves to visit cafes, bars, art galleries and anything hidden down a cobblestone laneway.… read more »

How to Best Provide Ankle Support for Netballers –Kids, Teenagers and Adults 

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Every Saturday you can probably guarantee that a handful of us “lucky” netballers will come away from the courts with “twisted/turned/sprained” ankles.

Why?

Netball is a game that involves an immense amount of dodging and quick turns. Unfortunately, these movements can put pressure on the lateral ligaments of the ankle. If we happen to overdo it and go into too much inversion (rolling in) we can actually sprain these ligaments.

Due to the nature of the healing process, if damaged ligaments will only regain 80% of their original strength. This means that the ligament will always be a little weaker.

What can we do?

Now apart from doing an excellent rehabilitation program to strengthen the surrounding muscles and improving proprioception, the best thing that netballers can do to provide stability while on the court is to tape or brace the ankle.

Taping

On TV you’ll see that the Australian Diamonds and athletes that play in the Suncorp Super Netball League will mostly decide to tape. This is because they have access to trained professionals who know exactly how to tape ankles for the players specific needs.

At the professional level all teams are looking to get an edge. There has … read more »

Ashby Smith

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)
Ashby graduated from RMIT with a double degree in Health Science and Applied Science in the field of Osteopathy. He has also completed a post-graduate certificate in Dry Needling.
He has had experience working with various local Aussie rules clubs as well as currently being on the medical team of Volleyball Victoria. ​
In the years leading up to his graduation as an Osteopath, Ashby worked in the fitness industry as an athletic performance coach.
He has a keen interest in helping his clients overcome their injury in order to achieve their goals, no matter how big or small. He uses many manual therapy techniques such as manipulation and soft tissue during treatment, as well as different exercise approaches to effectively and consistently manage his clients issues.​
In his spare time Ashby enjoys getting down to the beach for a surf, and loves having a kick of the footy.
Last year Ashby represented Victoria in open men’s Volleyball.
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A brief history of Pilates

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Pilates BrookeDid you know Pilates was created by a man?

There is a common stigma around Pilates that it is centered on females, dancers and those individuals alike. It was in fact Joseph Pilates who was the creator of Pilates back in the 1920’s.
Joseph Pilates has a background in Swedish gymnastics, martial arts, body building, skiing and diving. One of Joseph’s first jobs was a self-defense instructor where he went on to train the police.
A few years later, during world war one, he designed some of the Pilates mat exercise that are still practiced today. It is thought that due to these exercises, none of his fellow mates fell sick with the influenza epidemic that killed thousands. These exercises are still practiced today due to positive impact on health and the body.

There is also a stigma that Pilates is easy as it doesn’t involve vigorous cardio or large weights. This is a myth! Pilates exercises focus on deep intrinsic muscles rather than large muscles that you see in the mirror. It tones and sculpts the body from the inside out, focusing on the 6 primary principles- concentration, control, centering, precision, flow and breathing. These principles in combination with … read more »

Verity Boyd

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Put simply, Verrity LOVES being an Osteopath. With her friendly persona and compassionate nature, she will soon put a smile on your face as together you will build an alliance to determine a tailored treatment plan. She believes the key to managing injuries and pain, is for the patient to understand their exact diagnosis and the means behind the osteopathic approach.

Her goals for each client are to help them feel STRONG, ABLE and HAPPY. She embodies our belief that “Every body deserves to feel good”. To deliver these results Verity uses a range of osteopathic techniques, dry needling, clinical pilates and exercise rehabilitation.

Her passion for osteo was fueled by vast and exciting experiences; working for Stay Tuned as an intern, being selected for an osteopathic placement in Mumbai and Goan hospitals (India), and over two years of sports training for various football, netball and soccer teams.

When not in Elwood, Verity likes spending her time at the beach, preferably getting in a surf or two. Her enthusiasms extend to netball, which she has participated in from club level right through to the Victorian state league. Her dreams are to travel the world so if you have any advice … read more »

Simon Duncan

by (Osteopath)

Upon graduation from the European School of Osteopathy (UK) in 1999, with a B.Sc. (hons) in Osteopathy and Diploma in Osteopathy, Simon moved to Milan, Italy searching further challenges.

Although his patient list was primarily sedentary or manufacturing industry workers, his experience includes regularly treating some of Europe’s most elite ballerinas, contemporary dancers and maestri at La Scala, Milano and Studio Danza Insieme, professional tennis and basketball players, and elite level gymnasts.

Simon’s treatment success lies in the combining of tried and tested techniques with the creation of techniques developed for the actual presenting problem, not dividing, but integrating musculoskeletal, visceral and cranial body systems.

Simon firmly believes in treating the sapling so the tree grows straight, and so has been treating and helping infants for many years, especially his 3 young children who are his best advertisements.

While running a successful practice and, gaining 14 years of experience in teaching & clinical roles at the International College of Osteopathic Education, he completed a pitch-side medical assistance course in Scotland and an advanced course in Sports Osteopathy with the University of Bicocca Milan. Over the years, Simon has organised either the osteopathic services or the full medical services at the read more »

Posture, Breathing and Arthritis

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Osteoarthritis (OA)

OA is a group of chronic, degenerative conditions that effect joints (also known as Degenerative Joint Disease and osteoarthrosis). Arthritis means – inflammation of the joint but OA is more degenerative than inflammatory.  OA is the most common form of arthritis.

What happens to the joints in OA?

With repeated stress the cartilage in the joints initially thickens, then eventually breaks down, softens and becomes thinner. Later the underlying bone undergoes changes and becomes worn from contact of bone on bone.  Micro-fractures and cysts can appear which weaken the bone.  To support the joint, new bone is laid down at the edges of the joint and bony spurs occur which restrict movement.  These bony spurs can painfully compress nerve roots.

Symptoms:

Initially this is painless but the end result after a period of time is pain, bony enlargement and restricted mobility.

Where does OA occur?

Common locations of OA are in the hand, spine, hip and knee. Reduced pain and mobility are usually noticed in the morning or after periods of immobility and may improve as a person gets moving.  Nerve pain can also occur if nerves are irritated by bony spurs.

Diagnosis:

Diagnosis of OA can be … read more »

The Full Body Breath – Exercise and Benefits to your Health

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Breathing should involve the whole body, particularly the abdominal and thoracic cavities, but it is not uncommon for people, especially with chronic health issues, to not breathe efficiently using the correct body mechanics, often using some parts of the body whilst not using others.

The diaphragm, situated between the thoracic and abdominal cavities, is a key structure involved in breathing.  It has connections internally through the fascia above the base of the skull and can influence head and neck function (and help clear the mind and head).  It has a link to the neck through its nerve supply.  When functioning efficiently, it helps promote healthy spinal and organ movement and the flow of lymphatic/fluid from/to all areas of the body.

It is your internal personal masseur for your internal organs because when it ascends and descends throughout its range, it supports and massages structures above and below, contributing to healthy heart, lung and digestive function and also through pressure gradients between the thoracic cage and abdomen and (when coordinated with synchronous sacral rocking) will also influence urinary and reproductive organ function.  If the diaphragm moves several centimeters (and contributes also to a few millimeters of sacral rocking movement) with every … read more »