Time To Get Proactive!

by (Osteopath )

Time to Get Proactive!

Life is unpredictable and can be chaotic at times. But you don’t have to always let the unexpected get the best of you. The solution is to practice becoming proactive. By choosing to be proactive, you are choosing to take responsibility for your actions by planning ahead. You can be more deliberate with the choices you make instead of reacting to things only when they pop up. When you are reactive, you are forced to deal with situations with less time and limited resources.

The key behaviours that make you proactive include setting short term and long term goals; prioritising what you can control and staying consistent. When you make a habit out of these behaviours, you will be better equipped to tackle almost anything that comes your way. You can more readily identify potential obstacles and then work towards overcoming them before they become serious roadblocks.

So, do the things that future you will thank you for. These things might be like paying your bills early or stretching before you are in pain. Being proactive with your health can mean that you are in a better position to tackle unexpected health events. Ways of being … read more »

Hydrotherapy: workout in water!

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HYDROTHERAPY: Water As A Workout!

And you don’t need to be able to swim!

Research is consistently showing hydrotherapy, or aquatic exercise, to be as effective as land-based exercise in reducing pain and improving function [3][7]. It’s no wonder that hydrotherapy has been used as a treatment modality for hundreds of years!

  • It’s low impact

Great for managing rheumatoid or osteoarthritis, those who have difficulties exercising on land due to impact or pain [4].

  •  Thermotherapy

Relaxes muscles and relives joint stiffness [6].

  • Assists with chronic conditions

Arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia [6].

  • Preparation for or rehabilitation following joint replacement surgery
  • Facilitating recovery from certain strokes and brain injuries

But what really makes hydrotherapy so effective?

THE AMAZING PROPERTIES OF WATER

Buoyancy – The deeper you are submerged in water, the less you weigh. Exercising in water lessens the effects of impact exercise and relieves the joints of much of your bodyweight [1] [5]. Hence, one can tolerate a variety of exercise with better endurance, technique and reduced or no pain.

Heat – Hydrotherapy pools measure around 34°C in temperature, much warmer than your average lap pool! Heat increases circulation through the body, which can relieve muscle tightness and relieve stiffness in … read more »

What is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist and why should I see one?

by (Physiotherapist)

What is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist (AEP) and why should I see one?

Accredited Exercise Physiologists are university qualified allied health professionals equipped with the knowledge and skills to design, deliver and evaluate safe and effective exercise interventions. These can be for people with acute, sub-acute or chronic medical conditions, injuries or disabilities.

What are the requirements for becoming an AEP?

The requirements for becoming an AEP is to complete a minimum of 4 years university study at both a graduate level and post graduate (Masters) level. AEP’s are also required to complete over 500 hours of placement that gives them exposure not only to the healthy population but also to different conditions such as cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, neurological, mental health and cancer related conditions.

What is the difference between a Physio and an AEP?

The major difference is that AEP’s are unable to perform any form of manual therapy (hands on) to the client such as mobilisations, massage and manipulations. They can however do assessments similar to Physio’s like range of motion, manual muscle testing and other special tests. The primary mode of treatment of AEP’s is exercise which is more of hands off therapy.

What is the difference read more »

My Journey Into Pilates

by (Osteopath )

My Journey into Pilates 

How did I get started?

A few years ago, I tagged along with a friend for a free Pilates class week trial at the new local yoga and Pilates studio that opened. I was hooked from the moment the Pilates teacher said “And, pulse. 2. 3. 4.” I was religiously going 3 times a week.

What about Clinical Pilates?

A few months later, I injured my knee whilst sparring after a long day of taekwondo training. Although, my injury meant I had to take a break from taekwondo, thankfully, that didn’t stop me from doing Pilates. My Physiotherapist suggested that I try clinical Pilates instead.

Is there a difference between Pilates and Clinical Pilates?

There is a difference between Pilates and Clinical Pilates. Pilates is run as fitness classes for large groups of people. Clinical Pilates requires individual assessment which means that exercises are tailored to your specific needs and classes are no larger than four people.

And so, began a journey into clinical Pilates. I loved that the sessions were individualised to my injury. Under the guidance of my Physiotherapist, I was able to regain my confidence to return to taekwondo.

I knew that I … read more »

My Favourite Exercises

by (Physiotherapist)

My Favourite Exercises!

Exercise is one the most easily prescribed mode of treatment to improve health and wellbeing. There is irrefutable evidence that suggests the beneficial effects of exercise to prevent and treat several diseases. I feel privileged that I am able to use exercise as a form of treatment. In doing so, I always make sure that my client knows what the exercise is, how to do the exercise properly, why we’re doing this exercise and the benefits of the exercise. I always look for exercises where I can get the most benefit, meaning maximizing gains while promoting stability and control. Here are my top three prescribed exercises.

1. Glute Bridges
Personally, I think the gluteals are the most underrated muscle in the body. Some people would prefer bigger chest or back or biceps or triceps. They do not realize that it’s the gluteals that hold everything together. Gluteal muscle strength and endurance play a significant role in injury prevention, normalizing gait pattern and posture, eliminating pain and enhancing athletic performance.

The beauty of performing glute bridges is that unlike any other lower limb or hip exercise, you perform this exercise lying down, knees and feet hip width apart. … read more »

Australian Open Tennis: your personal entourage.

by (Osteopath)

Australian Open Tennis: your personal entourage.

Simon

Just a heads up, a little niggle will likely becomes a big niggle after you have played without a prep.

We have just the team, and if you are a tennis player, we can be your own private entourage prepping you for the big game. ????

I’m Simon and a tennis player myself, I love the game, and did my thesis on tennis, studying all the biomechanics, and then went and did a tennis coaching course to really understand how the game is taught at all levels.

I really enjoy linking all these bases of knowledge to help get the best outcome for my fellow tennis tragics!

read more »

Bursitis

by (Osteopath)

Bursitis? What is that?! 

Have you recently consulted with your Osteo or Physio who has referred you for an ultrasound? Did they mentioned the possibility that you have Bursitis? Well let me explain a bit about what that is!

Healthy vs BursitisWhat is a Bursa?

A Bursa is a fluid filled sac that acts as a cushion between muscles, tendons, joints and bones. The role of these Bursae is to reduce friction caused by movement around those joints. 

What is Bursitis?

Bursitis is inflammation of the Bursae. It is often a painful condition that affects the joints. It is commonly associated with over use or repetitive joint movements. It can however also be caused by poor postures, walking habits, long standing strength or structural imbalances. It is more common in those who are overweight, have some types of arthritis, elderly or diabetic, however it can also occur in healthy individuals. 

Common sites of Bursitis are: 

  • Shoulder 
  • Hip 
  • Knee 
  • Elbow 
  • Ankle 

Symptoms of Bursitis:

  • Pain or tenderness around the joint, especially if pressure is applied. 
  • Redness, warmth or swelling are usually uncommon but may be a sign of infection. 

Diagnosis of Bursitis:

A diagnosis of Bursitis is usually done through a thorough examination. … read more »

Tram Tran

by (Osteopath )

Tram is an enthusiastic and conscientious Osteopath who has graduated from RMIT University with a double bachelor’s degree in Health Sciences and Applied Sciences in Osteopathy.

Tram wants to truly understand the extent of how injury impacts upon her patient’s day-to-day life. She firmly believes in working collaboratively with her patients to create achievable goals in order to return them back to their life as soon as possible! Whilst in university, Tram discovered her passion for educating others in neuroscience and therefore, she endeavours to educate her patients regarding their diagnosis and their treatment plan.

Tram will commonly incorporate Dry Needling and Clinical Pilates as part of her treatments.

When not treating, Tram lives with two cats and can be found having a boogie wherever RnB is playing in Melbourne. She is a proud Melburnian who loves to visit cafes, bars, art galleries and anything hidden down a cobblestone laneway.… read more »

How to Best Provide Ankle Support for Netballers –Kids, Teenagers and Adults 

by (Osteopath & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Every Saturday you can probably guarantee that a handful of us “lucky” netballers will come away from the courts with “twisted/turned/sprained” ankles.

Why?

Netball is a game that involves an immense amount of dodging and quick turns. Unfortunately, these movements can put pressure on the lateral ligaments of the ankle. If we happen to overdo it and go into too much inversion (rolling in) we can actually sprain these ligaments.

Due to the nature of the healing process, if damaged ligaments will only regain 80% of their original strength. This means that the ligament will always be a little weaker.

What can we do?

Now apart from doing an excellent rehabilitation program to strengthen the surrounding muscles and improving proprioception, the best thing that netballers can do to provide stability while on the court is to tape or brace the ankle.

Taping

On TV you’ll see that the Australian Diamonds and athletes that play in the Suncorp Super Netball League will mostly decide to tape. This is because they have access to trained professionals who know exactly how to tape ankles for the players specific needs.

At the professional level all teams are looking to get an edge. There has … read more »

Ashby Smith

by (Osteopath )
Ashby graduated from RMIT with a double degree in Health Science and Applied Science in the field of Osteopathy. He has also completed a post-graduate certificate in Dry Needling.
He has had experience working with various local Aussie rules clubs as well as currently being on the medical team of Volleyball Victoria. ​
In the years leading up to his graduation as an Osteopath, Ashby worked in the fitness industry as an athletic performance coach.
He has a keen interest in helping his clients overcome their injury in order to achieve their goals, no matter how big or small. He uses many manual therapy techniques such as manipulation and soft tissue during treatment, as well as different exercise approaches to effectively and consistently manage his clients issues.​
In his spare time Ashby enjoys getting down to the beach for a surf, and loves having a kick of the footy.
Last year Ashby represented Victoria in open men’s Volleyball.
read more »