Cassandra Stuchbery

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Cassie is a people-focused Dietitian who has a strong passion for all things food and nutrition. She is an Accredited Practising Dietitian and Accredited Nutritionist with a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics. Cassie is also a NDIS approved provider.

With a background in chronic disease and weight management Cassie enjoys helping and motivating clients with tailored nutrition programs. She also works providing sports nutrition advice to the Australian Sports Climbing team and regularly presents to young athletes.

Cassie is passionate about helping you make lasting changes to have a long term impact on your health, no fad diets or temporary solutions!

 … read more »

Heart Health and Cholesterol Management

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Eating a healthy diet can reduce your risk of heart disease. If you have high cholesterol levels you can improve them by following a healthy eating pattern.

What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a fatty substance found in the blood that is made by the liver. A small amount of cholesterol in the blood is important for health; however, high cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for heart disease.

LDL-cholesterol (Low Density Lipoprotein) – known as the ‘bad’ cholesterol. It is deposited in the walls of the blood vessels causing blockages. High LDL-cholesterol levels in your blood increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.

J HDL-cholesterol (High Density Lipoprotein) – is known as the ‘good’ cholesterol. HDL carries cholesterol away from the blood vessels back to the liver to be reused by the body. If your HDL-cholesterol level is high, this will help reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.

L Triglycerides are fatty substances found in your blood that are made from the fats and sugars found in food and drinks. Triglycerides can be used by your body for energy, but if there are more triglycerides produced than the body needs they are … read more »

Diabetes Management

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (sugar) in the blood.

Glucose is the main source of energy for the body and comes from carbohydrate foods we eat. Carbohydrate foods include bread, pasta, rice, cereals, fruits, starchy vegetables, legumes, and milk and yoghurt. The body breaks carbohydrates down to glucose which then enters the blood stream. For glucose to enter the cells and be used for energy, a hormone called insulin must be available.

Diabetes occurs when the body does not make insulin or when the insulin that is made is not working properly. This leads to increased blood glucose levels and diabetes.

Learning how to manage your diabetes will help you feel better and help to prevent health complications caused by high blood glucose levels. Healthy eating and knowing how food affects your blood glucose levels plays an essential role in you managing your diabetes.

What should I eat?

A healthy diet for diabetes includes the right balance of carbohydrate, protein, and fat.

To help manage your diabetes, your meals should be:

  • An appropriate size – not too large
  • Regular and spread evenly throughout the day
  • Lower in fat, particularly saturated fat
  • Based
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Nutrition and healthy eating for a new Mum

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

The arrival of your new baby is extremely exciting and stressful as it requires you to make a lot of adjustments. It is common that new mums and dads experience appetite disturbances, where they may feel disinterested in food. This is often caused by sleep disturbances.

Your diet gives you the energy you need during the day and keeps your body nourished so that it runs at its peak. Five small meals a day is recommended, but if you are finding it difficult to fit everything in as well as taking care of your new born, make sure you are eating at least three meals daily. This is important to ensure you get all the nutrients you need to recover from the birth as well as helping you make milk if you are breastfeeding.

We advise the following to ensure you maintain a nutritious and healthy diet.

  • Eat a variety of different coloured fruit and vegetables daily.  These provide vitamins and minerals for your immune system and overall health.
  • Eat plenty of breads and cereals which include wholegrains, rice and pasta for energy.
  • Eat protein every day including meat, chicken, fish, eggs and cheese. Protein helps to repair tissues and
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Warm up with a hearty bowl of Bean and Kale soup

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Recipe adapted from Good Taste magazine via Body & Soul

Serves 4 (prep 20 mins + 8 hours soaking time, cooking 1 hr 20)
1 cup dried beans – any type; black beans or borlotti work well
1 tbs olive oil
1 large brown onion finely chopped
2 carrots finely chopped
2 celery sticks finely chopped
2 garlic cloves crushed (or 1tsp minced garlic)
2 tsp fresh thyme leaves
1/4 tsp chilli flakes
400g  no added salt tinned diced tomatoes
1tbs no added salt tomato paste
5 cups (1.25L) water
1 bunch kale, stalks trimmed and shredded
Pepper to taste
Method:
Place beans in a bowl and cover with cold water. Soak for 8 hours and drain. *If pressed for time and using tinned beans in place of dried beans, you will not need to soak them)
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat and add onion, carrot and celery. Stir occasionally, cooking for 6-7 mins or until soft.
Add garlic, thyme and chilli. Stir for 1 minute then add tomato paste, and stir for another minute.
Add beans, diced tomato and water to the saucepan. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, partially covered,
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Grains and weight loss – the whole story!

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Grains and Weight LossIt is no secret that most Australians would like to shed some unwanted kilos, however, with all of the mixed messages within the media these days how does one decipher what is the best approach to weight loss? One particular theme within the media that is also generally spruiked by personal trainers at gyms all around the country, seems to be the focus on cutting carbs, or as I like to refer to it, ‘carbophobia’.

Cutting carbs equals optimal weight loss, right? Well actually, recent research suggests otherwise. A study performed amongst young Australian women supported the benefits of a higher protein diet, which included 4 serves of nutrient rich grain foods each day. This approach helped manage hunger while providing a nutrient rich diet that women are more likely to follow in the long term. By six months the women who kept up with this balanced approach were able to achieve over 9% body weight loss, which they then maintained and improved upon over the full 12 months.

So what does a serve of grains look like? If you were to have 2/3 cup high fibre cereal for breakfast, a sandwich with 2 slices of wholegrain bread at lunch, … read more »

Satisfying the munchies

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Snacks are an important inclusion to the daily dietary intake to help top up your energy stores and keep you going throughout the day. In today’s society we are quite time poor and resort to quick and readily available foods which tend to be nutrient poor and high in energy such as chips and chocolate. This makes it difficult to achieve a healthy intake. For many individuals, poor snack choices can lead to unwanted weight gain and overall poor health.  Snacks which are nutritious can assist with increasing concentration and therefore work productivity, increase energy levels as well as provide key nutrients for health. When you’re next stuck for ideas to satisfy the munchies between main meals try one of my top 6 snack ideas below.

 

1.      SEASONAL FRUITS

Enjoy the broad variety of winter fruits which are starting to appear in local supermarkets; apples, grapefruit, mandarins and oranges. 1 serve of fruit will provide a low energy snack (approximately half the calories of 5 small squares of plain milk chocolate) that is also full of fibre, vitamins and minerals which are important for gut health, immune function, blood sugar control and other key bodily functions. It will satisfy … read more »

Emma Morris

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Emma Morris is a highly qualified and experienced Dietitian and Sports Dietitian. She has a Bachelor of Applied Science in Human Movement as well as a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics.

As well as practicing full time at Stay Tuned Sports Medicine, Emma is also the Dietitian for Williamstown Football Club and regularly presents to a variety of sporting clubs.

Emma will help you get off the dieting merry-go-round and assist you to make changes that will stay with you over your lifetime.… read more »