Diaphragmatic Breathing

by (Osteopath )

Diaphragmatic Breathing

What is the Diaphragm?

The Diaphragm is the most efficient muscle of breathing. It is a large, dome-shaped muscle located at the base of the lungs. Your abdominal muscles help move the Diaphragm and give you more power to empty your lungs. When you become stressed or anxious, your breathing will become shallower. This means that the Diaphragm will not function as well as it should and the accessory muscles of breathing – which are located in your neck and chest – will do most of the work.

This can leave the Diaphragm weakened and flattened, causing it to work less efficiently, as well as the neck and chest muscles being overworked.

What is Diaphragmatic Breathing?

Diaphragmatic breathing is intended to help you use the Diaphragm correctly while breathing to:

  • Strengthen the Diaphragm
  • Decrease the work of breathing by slowing your breathing rate
  • Decrease oxygen demand
  • Use less effort and energy to breathe
Diaphragmatic Breathing Technique

Lie on your back on a flat surface or in bed, with your knees bent and your head supported. You can use a pillow under your knees to support your legs. Place one hand on your upper chest and the other just

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Ashby Smith

by (Osteopath )
Ashby graduated from RMIT with a double degree in Health Science and Applied Science in the field of Osteopathy. He has also completed a post-graduate certificate in Dry Needling.
He has had experience working with various local Aussie rules clubs as well as currently being on the medical team of Volleyball Victoria. ​
In the years leading up to his graduation as an Osteopath, Ashby worked in the fitness industry as an athletic performance coach.
He has a keen interest in helping his clients overcome their injury in order to achieve their goals, no matter how big or small. He uses many manual therapy techniques such as manipulation and soft tissue during treatment, as well as different exercise approaches to effectively and consistently manage his clients issues.​
In his spare time Ashby enjoys getting down to the beach for a surf, and loves having a kick of the footy.
Last year Ashby represented Victoria in open men’s Volleyball.
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James Tran

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James graduated Remedial Massage in 2018 at RMIT University and has also completed his Adv. Dip in Myotherapy in 2019. James established his interest in human anatomy after going through many periods of injuries himself.

James has a passion for competitive sports. He has been playing tennis since he was 10 and lifting weights at the gym since he was 13. He also played rugby throughout his days at school and university. In addition, James’ passion for lifting weights lead to his first and recent bodybuilding competition and he aims to compete again in the future. James has a keen interest in strength and conditioning and loves to know the biomechanics of the human body which he will be undertaking further studies in.

James really enjoys meeting with people and treating their conditions, however, he particularly enjoys treating SIJ and lower back pain.

James can help you on your journey to feel great and perform at your best!… read more »

Kane Theisinger

by (Osteopath)

Growing up, Kane has always had a keen interest in helping others, having been a surf life saver and originally aspiring to be a Paramedic. He was later drawn to osteopathy after treatments for various football and athletic injuries which gave him an insight into the holistic and individual approach osteopaths take to each patient, whilst addressing the causative factors rather than just the symptoms.

Kane enjoys treating patients from all ages and understands that every person is unique, which requires a tailored approach to their treatment and management. Kane also places great importance giving each patient a constructive understanding of their musculoskeletal complaint and ways in which we can work together to return to what it is you love doing.

Outside the treatment room, you will find Kane has a keen interest in seeing other parts of the world, spending time at the beach and supporting his mighty Tigers at the MCG.… read more »

Fiona Tydde

by (Physiotherapist & Clinical Pilates Instructor)

Fiona grew up on the sunny shores of Perth where she completed a Bachelor of Science (Physiotherapy) at Curtin University. After graduating in 2010 she moved to Melbourne and completed further qualifications in Clinical Pilates with Dance Medicine Australia as well as Sports and Spinal Dry Needling.

Fiona has worked in private practices across Australia and the UK. She has treated a wide range of Musculoskeletal, Sports and Spinal injuries and has a special interest in women health such as pre and post natal conditions, especially since the birth of her own little boy!

Fiona takes a holistic and personalised approach with every patient and truly believes in the importance of functional rehabilitation for long term results. Fiona strives to help you achieve your goals as quickly as possible. 

In her spare time Fiona enjoys spending time with her young family, yoga and running – she even completed the Paris marathon in 2015!

Fiona works as a Physiotherapist & Group Exercise Rehab Instructor at our Elwood clinic.read more »

Pillows and Matresses

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

We spend a third of our lives (if you’re lucky) on our pillows and mattresses but often underestimate their influence on our health and bodies.
But how do you know a good mattress or pillow to a bad one?

My advice to patients is fairly simple. A good mattress is not about how hard or soft it is (that is based on your preference and weight) but how well it is sprung or conforms to your body’s shape. A simply test for this is to place an empty cup on the mattress and then push firmly down about 10cm away. On a good mattress, the cup should not fall towards your fist. This simulates your hips pushing into the mattress when side lying, whilst your spine remains supported. How hard you push depends on how heavy you are and your personal preference for a firm or soft mattress. Generally the heavier the body, the firmer the mattress.

With pillows we suggest you should always look for a contoured supportive pillow. Soft pillows may feel nice to begin with but over the course of hours, will generally provide no support for the neck. This is more important as we age and … read more »

Regan Gardiner

by (Myotherapist)

Regan discovered a love of anatomy whilst studying her Double Diploma of Sports Development – it was at this time that she decided on a career in Myotherapy.

Completing her degree in early 2015 at the Southern School of Natural Therapies, Regan spent time working at Carlton Football as a Myotherapist. Working at the football club exposed her to a range of injuries including muscle strains, sprains and overuse injuries.

In her consults Regan uses a combination of tchniques including soft & deep tissue massage, myofascial release, trigger-point therapy, cupping, dry needling, stretching, joint mobilisation and corrective exercises.

Regan believes that treatment is a two way street – the client needs to be involved in their recovery by completing prescribed exercises, self massage, stretching and therapy aids to assist the treatment plan.read more »

Posture, Breathing and Arthritis

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Osteoarthritis (OA)

OA is a group of chronic, degenerative conditions that effect joints (also known as Degenerative Joint Disease and osteoarthrosis). Arthritis means – inflammation of the joint but OA is more degenerative than inflammatory.  OA is the most common form of arthritis.

What happens to the joints in OA?

With repeated stress the cartilage in the joints initially thickens, then eventually breaks down, softens and becomes thinner. Later the underlying bone undergoes changes and becomes worn from contact of bone on bone.  Micro-fractures and cysts can appear which weaken the bone.  To support the joint, new bone is laid down at the edges of the joint and bony spurs occur which restrict movement.  These bony spurs can painfully compress nerve roots.

Symptoms:

Initially this is painless but the end result after a period of time is pain, bony enlargement and restricted mobility.

Where does OA occur?

Common locations of OA are in the hand, spine, hip and knee. Reduced pain and mobility are usually noticed in the morning or after periods of immobility and may improve as a person gets moving.  Nerve pain can also occur if nerves are irritated by bony spurs.

Diagnosis:

Diagnosis of OA can be … read more »

10 tips to prevent back and neck pain during flights

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

neck pillowFrequent business trips and long haul travel can have a detrimental effect to lower back and neck health.  Sitting for long periods in a cramped chair and a stuffy environment can create and exacerbate musculoskeletal complaints.  It’s the last thing you need if you are in and out on a quick business trip where efficiency is the key. Muscular back and neck pain will also very quickly dampen your long awaited tropical destination holiday.

Luckily enough there are some very simple tips that are easily achieved and reduce the chance of aggravating your lower back and neck.

  1. Drink lots of water before and during your flight.  This works on many different levels.
    • Drinking lots of water will leave you feeling less jetlagged and less dehydrated post flight.
    • Water keeps your joints and discs hydrated which in turn reduces stiffness and decompression of your spine.
    • It makes you need to go to the toilet.  This means you have to be mobile throughout the flight.
  2. Every hour, get up and walk for five minutes around the cabin. Not only does it increase circulation and help prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis, but it reduces stiffness in the joints and tightness in your muscles.
  3. Complete
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Natalie Miller

by (Myotherapist)

Natalie has a keen interest in injury prevention, management and maintenance stemming from personal experience as a competitive swimmer, athletics participant and basketball player. Natalie enjoys helping people achieve a musculoskeletal balance to help reach their optimal health.

She gained her Advanced Diploma of Myotherapy at RMIT in addition to a Diploma in Sports Development and Athlete Support, and has completed a 12 month soft tissue therapy internship at the Carlton football club. She treats a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions and more recently undertook further studies in pregnancy massage. She also has great results treating headaches and migraines, stress, tension and general aches and pains.

Using various soft tissue techniques, stretching and corrective exercise, Natalie is able to help you meet your goals and be your best whether you are a weekend warrior or serious athlete. She also enjoys hot rock massage to help melt your muscle tension away. With 9 years experience working at Knox Leisureworks YMCA, Natalie is a familiar face at the Boronia clinic.

 … read more »