Healthy Eating on a Vegan Diet

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Vegan DietPlant-based and vegan diets are becoming more and more popular each day. In fact, according to Google Trends, searches on the word ‘vegan’ have increased by almost 200% in the past 5 years. Some of the reasons are the rise in the awareness of animal welfare and the impact of our food on the environment but people are also ditching animal products as a way to improve their health.

The Benefits:

There is some research to show that vegan diets can reduce your risk of obesity, artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and some types of cancer. These benefits, however, depend on you having a well-balanced eating plan with enough nutrients.

The Risks:

As with any change in your eating habits it’s very easy to miss out on crucial vitamins and minerals when reducing the variety of foods that you eat. Meats, for example, are rich sources of protein, easily digestible iron and vitamin B12. Dairy products are also rich in vitamin B12 and contain high levels of calcium.

The side-effects of not getting enough nutrition when eating vegan could be:

  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Heart palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vision loss
  • Dizziness
  • Depression
  • Memory loss
  • Tingling in hands and feet
read more »

Magnesium- what is it and how can I get enough in my diet?

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

What is Magnesium?

  • Magnesium is a mineral that you need every day for good health.
  • Magnesium helps you take energy from food and make new proteins.
  • It is also an important part of your bones, and helps keep your muscles and nerves healthy.
  • Some people find that magnesium-rich foods or supplements help to reduce their cramping and muscle soreness.
  • The best sources of magnesium are legumes, nuts, seeds, fish and whole grains.

 

How much Magnesium should I aim for?

Daily target

Men 19-30yrs

330mg

Men 30+yrs

350mg

Women 19-30yrs

255mg

Women 30+yrs

265mg

** Magnesium from supplements should not exceed 350 mg per day. It is safe to consume more than your daily magnesium needs from food.

 

How can I get enough Magnesium without taking supplements?

The following table shows you which foods are good sources of Magnesium.

Food

Serving size

Magnesium (mg)

All bran

30g

83

 

Almonds

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1⁄4 cup

 

123

 

Banana

 

1 med

 

25

 

Brazil nuts

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1⁄4 cup

 

116

Brown rice

 

1 cup

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86

Cashews

1⁄4 cup

83

 

Dark chocolate

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40g

 

48

Firm tofu

 

150g

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112

Greek yogurt

175g

28

Hazelnuts

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1⁄4 cup

53

Kale, cooked

read more »

Diet Culture and Kids.

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

 

Cassandra Stuchbery, Dietitan.

How ‘dieting’ might be affecting your kids.

The phrase ‘diet culture’ has been gaining a lot of interest in the past few years. It’s used to describe any words, phrases, products or activities that encourage eating according to strict rules. Here are some signs that you might be a part of ‘diet culture’:

  • You use words like ‘good’ and ‘bad’ to describe foods (apart from milk that’s gone bad for example)
  • You follow a set of rules when you eat eg. Not eating after 8pm, not eating bread, only having low fat foods
  • You are avoiding a certain food group to try to lose weight eg. Keto, paleo, vegan
  • The way you eat tends to get in the way of your social life or family life (maybe you’re cooking separate dinners, can’t eat out etc.)

The problem with this kind of thinking is that it teaches us to ignore our internal body signals. At the end of the day even the smartest people in the world can’t know what your body needs better than you (the person walking around in it!). Kids have an amazing innate sense of hunger and fullness which guides them in how much to eat … read more »

5 Biggest Nutrition Mistakes According to a Dietitian

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

nutrition  CassI work with people every day who are trying to improve their health and wellbeing with food. In my consults, I hear some of the same problems cropping up over and over again. So here’s my list of five nutrition mistakes that I see every day.

 

  1. Going on a diet

It might seem crazy to hear that, as a dietitian, I hate diets. The reason is that diets tend to have two things in common:

  1. They have arbitrary rules that don’t consider you as an individual
  2. They are temporary.

I often ask my clients “do you see yourself eating this way when you’re 80?” No? Then why start now? If you want to make a permanent change to your health and wellbeing you need a permanent change in what you eat. So my advice – make changes that you can keep up with, long-term.

 

  1. Not drinking enough (water that is)

Most of my clients do not drink enough water. They could be too busy, have trouble getting access to water or just don’t like it. Dehydration can make you feel tired which makes it harder to make good decisions about food. Some people also experience cravings for food … read more »

Heart Health and Cholesterol Management

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Eating a healthy diet can reduce your risk of heart disease. If you have high cholesterol levels you can improve them by following a healthy eating pattern.

What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a fatty substance found in the blood that is made by the liver. A small amount of cholesterol in the blood is important for health; however, high cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for heart disease.

LDL-cholesterol (Low Density Lipoprotein) – known as the ‘bad’ cholesterol. It is deposited in the walls of the blood vessels causing blockages. High LDL-cholesterol levels in your blood increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.

J HDL-cholesterol (High Density Lipoprotein) – is known as the ‘good’ cholesterol. HDL carries cholesterol away from the blood vessels back to the liver to be reused by the body. If your HDL-cholesterol level is high, this will help reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.

L Triglycerides are fatty substances found in your blood that are made from the fats and sugars found in food and drinks. Triglycerides can be used by your body for energy, but if there are more triglycerides produced than the body needs they are … read more »

Diabetes Management

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (sugar) in the blood.

Glucose is the main source of energy for the body and comes from carbohydrate foods we eat. Carbohydrate foods include bread, pasta, rice, cereals, fruits, starchy vegetables, legumes, and milk and yoghurt. The body breaks carbohydrates down to glucose which then enters the blood stream. For glucose to enter the cells and be used for energy, a hormone called insulin must be available.

Diabetes occurs when the body does not make insulin or when the insulin that is made is not working properly. This leads to increased blood glucose levels and diabetes.

Learning how to manage your diabetes will help you feel better and help to prevent health complications caused by high blood glucose levels. Healthy eating and knowing how food affects your blood glucose levels plays an essential role in you managing your diabetes.

What should I eat?

A healthy diet for diabetes includes the right balance of carbohydrate, protein, and fat.

To help manage your diabetes, your meals should be:

  • An appropriate size – not too large
  • Regular and spread evenly throughout the day
  • Lower in fat, particularly saturated fat
  • Based
read more »

Warm up with a hearty bowl of Bean and Kale soup

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Recipe adapted from Good Taste magazine via Body & Soul

Serves 4 (prep 20 mins + 8 hours soaking time, cooking 1 hr 20)
1 cup dried beans – any type; black beans or borlotti work well
1 tbs olive oil
1 large brown onion finely chopped
2 carrots finely chopped
2 celery sticks finely chopped
2 garlic cloves crushed (or 1tsp minced garlic)
2 tsp fresh thyme leaves
1/4 tsp chilli flakes
400g  no added salt tinned diced tomatoes
1tbs no added salt tomato paste
5 cups (1.25L) water
1 bunch kale, stalks trimmed and shredded
Pepper to taste
Method:
Place beans in a bowl and cover with cold water. Soak for 8 hours and drain. *If pressed for time and using tinned beans in place of dried beans, you will not need to soak them)
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat and add onion, carrot and celery. Stir occasionally, cooking for 6-7 mins or until soft.
Add garlic, thyme and chilli. Stir for 1 minute then add tomato paste, and stir for another minute.
Add beans, diced tomato and water to the saucepan. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, partially covered, … read more »

Grains and weight loss – the whole story!

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Grains and Weight LossIt is no secret that most Australians would like to shed some unwanted kilos, however, with all of the mixed messages within the media these days how does one decipher what is the best approach to weight loss? One particular theme within the media that is also generally spruiked by personal trainers at gyms all around the country, seems to be the focus on cutting carbs, or as I like to refer to it, ‘carbophobia’.

Cutting carbs equals optimal weight loss, right? Well actually, recent research suggests otherwise. A study performed amongst young Australian women supported the benefits of a higher protein diet, which included 4 serves of nutrient rich grain foods each day. This approach helped manage hunger while providing a nutrient rich diet that women are more likely to follow in the long term. By six months the women who kept up with this balanced approach were able to achieve over 9% body weight loss, which they then maintained and improved upon over the full 12 months.

So what does a serve of grains look like? If you were to have 2/3 cup high fibre cereal for breakfast, a sandwich with 2 slices of wholegrain bread at lunch, … read more »

Emma Morris

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Emma Morris is a highly qualified and experienced Dietitian and Sports Dietitian. She has a Bachelor of Applied Science in Human Movement as well as a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics.

As well as practicing full time at Stay Tuned Sports Medicine, Emma is also the Dietitian for Williamstown Football Club and regularly presents to a variety of sporting clubs.

Emma will help you get off the dieting merry-go-round and assist you to make changes that will stay with you over your lifetime.… read more »

The new fad: The Fast Diet

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Brace yourselves! A new diet is getting lots of media attention and hype.  This new fad is called the Fast Diet, that comes from a book written by Dr Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer. Dr Mosley is a medical journalist and Mimi Spencer is a food and fashion writer.  The Fast Diet is also known as the 5:2 diet. It involves five days of normal eating, and two days of fasting (approximately 500 calories for women and 600 calories for men). According to the authors, the two (non-consecutive) days of fasting per week will result in the metabolism working harder on the days you don’t fast. To give you a bit of an idea about how far those 500 calories could stretch: one medium banana has about 100 calories. One orange also has about 100. There are about 250 calories alone in a cup of plain cooked pasta. Add a bit of sauce and cheese and you’ve probably reached your limit for the day.  Normal daily intake for a woman is 2000 calories. So you’re basically cutting your recommended food intake by 75 per cent. Feeling hungry yet?

The Fast Diet is intended to result in weight loss and general … read more »