Soups to keep you feeling full!

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

In the cooler months soups can be a great way to warm up. Here are some soup recipes that are high in protein so they’ll fill you up for longer.

Broccoli Soup:broccolisoup

Takes: 20 mins

Serves: 3

Ingredients

  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 2 sticks of celery
  • 400 g broccoli
  • ½ a bunch of fresh mint
  • olive oil
  • 1 litre salt-reduced chicken or vegetable stock
  • 500g reduced fat ricotta cheese

Method

Peel and finely chop the garlic. Trim and roughly chop the celery and broccoli. Pick the mint leaves, then finely chop most of them, saving a few baby leaves to garnish.

Heat a splash of oil in a pan, then soften the garlic and celery for about 2 to 3 minutes, then add the broccoli and stock. Continue cooking for another 5 minutes, then blitz with a handful of mint in a food processor.

Season and then crumble over the ricotta and scatter with the reserved mint leaves to serve.

Adapted from Jamieoliver.com

 

Lamb & Barley Soup:

Time: 1 hr 20 mins + overnight cooling

Serves: 6

Ingredients

  • 500g lamb off cuts (on the bone)
  • 1 carrot, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, including the leaves, chopped
  • 1 potato, chopped
  • 1
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A day on a plate of a Dietitian

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

A day on a plate of a Dietitian

I work every day with people who are trying to change their eating to improve their health, feel more energy and manage hunger and cravings. I love to offer people time saving tips, places to look for recipes and ways to make sure their food is nutritious even if they’re in a hurry. This often makes people ask – what do you eat? So here it is! A day in the life of a dietitian (roughly).

I do want to preface this by saying that this diet is specific to me, I am a young(ish), 5’7” female who exercises for an hour most days. This diet is almost definitely not the right one for you but if you’d like to me to help you find what is you’re welcome to ask me.

7:30am wake up

I am not, I repeat NOT, a morning person. So I manage to pull myself out of bed each morning but I’m usually in a rush to get ready.

8:00am breakfast

Although I’m in such a rush I always make time for breakfast, albeit a quick one. My favourite breakfast is Greek yogurt, home-made stewed fruit and … read more »

Have FUN with fruit!

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Have FUN with fruit!

Fruit is a great natural source of vitamins, fibre and energy. The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating recommends that most people eat 2 servings of fruit every day. Try out the recipes for some new and different ways to eat fruit.

Strawberry and Kiwifruit Popsicles

Strawberry and Kiwifruit popsiclesTakes 5min + freezing time

Makes 6

Ingredients

· 6 plastic cups + 6 popsicle sticks (or an icy pole mould)

· 250g strawberries, hulled and sliced

· 2 kiwifruit, peeled and chopped

· 1 ½ cups orange juice

Method

Drop strawberries and kiwi fruit into each disposable cup or icy pole mould. Pour orange juice over fruit, add a pop stick to each cup and freeze until set. Run under hot water to remove from cup or mould.

Adapted from livelighter.com.au

 

Frozen yogurt layer cake

Frozen yoghurt layer cake

Takes 15min

Serves 12-16

Ingredients

· 250 g strawberries

· 16 tablespoons natural yogurt

· 250 g banana

· 250 g raspberries

· 250 g blueberries

· 250g blackberries or cherries

Method

Line a loaf tin with cling film. In a blender or food processor, blitz the strawberries with 4 tablespoons of yogurt. Pour the fruit mixture into the tin and place in the … read more »

Healthy Eating on a Vegan Diet

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Vegan DietPlant-based and vegan diets are becoming more and more popular each day. In fact, according to Google Trends, searches on the word ‘vegan’ have increased by almost 200% in the past 5 years. Some of the reasons are the rise in the awareness of animal welfare and the impact of our food on the environment but people are also ditching animal products as a way to improve their health.

The Benefits:

There is some research to show that vegan diets can reduce your risk of obesity, artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and some types of cancer. These benefits, however, depend on you having a well-balanced eating plan with enough nutrients.

The Risks:

As with any change in your eating habits it’s very easy to miss out on crucial vitamins and minerals when reducing the variety of foods that you eat. Meats, for example, are rich sources of protein, easily digestible iron and vitamin B12. Dairy products are also rich in vitamin B12 and contain high levels of calcium.

The side-effects of not getting enough nutrition when eating vegan could be:

  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Heart palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vision loss
  • Dizziness
  • Depression
  • Memory loss
  • Tingling in hands and feet
read more »

Cassandra Stuchbery

by (Dietitian and Sports Dietitian)

Cassandra completed her Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics and Monash University in 2014 and is now an Accredited Practising Dietitian and Accredited Nutritionist. She believes in using nutrition education to help people take control of their own health.

Cassandra has experience with helping people with a wide range of conditions, however, she has a special interest in helping people manage their food intolerance’s and lose weight in a sustainable way. Cassandra’s motto is “If you don’t want to do it for life then why start now?” as she aims to help people make long terms change to their nutrition to get long term results.

Cassandra consults at our Boronia clinic. She is a registered provider for Medicare, NDIS, DVA and Private Health Insurance.

 … read more »

Heart Health and Cholesterol Management

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Eating a healthy diet can reduce your risk of heart disease. If you have high cholesterol levels you can improve them by following a healthy eating pattern.

What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a fatty substance found in the blood that is made by the liver. A small amount of cholesterol in the blood is important for health; however, high cholesterol levels are a major risk factor for heart disease.

LDL-cholesterol (Low Density Lipoprotein) – known as the ‘bad’ cholesterol. It is deposited in the walls of the blood vessels causing blockages. High LDL-cholesterol levels in your blood increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.

J HDL-cholesterol (High Density Lipoprotein) – is known as the ‘good’ cholesterol. HDL carries cholesterol away from the blood vessels back to the liver to be reused by the body. If your HDL-cholesterol level is high, this will help reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.

L Triglycerides are fatty substances found in your blood that are made from the fats and sugars found in food and drinks. Triglycerides can be used by your body for energy, but if there are more triglycerides produced than the body needs they are … read more »

Diabetes Management

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (sugar) in the blood.

Glucose is the main source of energy for the body and comes from carbohydrate foods we eat. Carbohydrate foods include bread, pasta, rice, cereals, fruits, starchy vegetables, legumes, and milk and yoghurt. The body breaks carbohydrates down to glucose which then enters the blood stream. For glucose to enter the cells and be used for energy, a hormone called insulin must be available.

Diabetes occurs when the body does not make insulin or when the insulin that is made is not working properly. This leads to increased blood glucose levels and diabetes.

Learning how to manage your diabetes will help you feel better and help to prevent health complications caused by high blood glucose levels. Healthy eating and knowing how food affects your blood glucose levels plays an essential role in you managing your diabetes.

What should I eat?

A healthy diet for diabetes includes the right balance of carbohydrate, protein, and fat.

To help manage your diabetes, your meals should be:

  • An appropriate size – not too large
  • Regular and spread evenly throughout the day
  • Lower in fat, particularly saturated fat
  • Based
read more »

Warm up with a hearty bowl of Bean and Kale soup

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Recipe adapted from Good Taste magazine via Body & Soul

Serves 4 (prep 20 mins + 8 hours soaking time, cooking 1 hr 20)
1 cup dried beans – any type; black beans or borlotti work well
1 tbs olive oil
1 large brown onion finely chopped
2 carrots finely chopped
2 celery sticks finely chopped
2 garlic cloves crushed (or 1tsp minced garlic)
2 tsp fresh thyme leaves
1/4 tsp chilli flakes
400g  no added salt tinned diced tomatoes
1tbs no added salt tomato paste
5 cups (1.25L) water
1 bunch kale, stalks trimmed and shredded
Pepper to taste
Method:
Place beans in a bowl and cover with cold water. Soak for 8 hours and drain. *If pressed for time and using tinned beans in place of dried beans, you will not need to soak them)
Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat and add onion, carrot and celery. Stir occasionally, cooking for 6-7 mins or until soft.
Add garlic, thyme and chilli. Stir for 1 minute then add tomato paste, and stir for another minute.
Add beans, diced tomato and water to the saucepan. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, partially covered,
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Diabetes and the foot

by (Podiatrist)

Diabetes Beach FeetDiabetes is a condition in which the body’s method of converting glucose into energy is not working as it should; meaning the amount of glucose in the blood is elevated.

There are two common types of diabetes being:

Type 1, also known as insulin dependent diabetes. This usually affects children and young adults.  People with this type of diabetes require daily insulin injections.

Type 2, also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes, is by far the most common and usually affects people over the age of 40 years.

Diabetes, whether it is type 1 or 2 can cause numerous long term complications in the body, but the main one being the affect on blood supply in our body by narrowing arteries.

The most common reason a diabetic patient is administered into hospital is due to their feet.

How does diabetes affect the feet?

1. Poor circulation, causing decreased healing rates, dry skin, cold feet, cramping etc.

2. Loss of sensation. The nerves need blood supply too. This may cause numbness, burning and injury without pain.

3. Muscle weakness

4. Foot deformity

5. Ulceration

6. Amputation

If you have poor circulation, you will need to take extra care to protect … read more »

Grains and weight loss – the whole story!

by (Dietitian & Sports Dietitian)

Grains and Weight LossIt is no secret that most Australians would like to shed some unwanted kilos, however, with all of the mixed messages within the media these days how does one decipher what is the best approach to weight loss? One particular theme within the media that is also generally spruiked by personal trainers at gyms all around the country, seems to be the focus on cutting carbs, or as I like to refer to it, ‘carbophobia’.

Cutting carbs equals optimal weight loss, right? Well actually, recent research suggests otherwise. A study performed amongst young Australian women supported the benefits of a higher protein diet, which included 4 serves of nutrient rich grain foods each day. This approach helped manage hunger while providing a nutrient rich diet that women are more likely to follow in the long term. By six months the women who kept up with this balanced approach were able to achieve over 9% body weight loss, which they then maintained and improved upon over the full 12 months.

So what does a serve of grains look like? If you were to have 2/3 cup high fibre cereal for breakfast, a sandwich with 2 slices of wholegrain bread at lunch, … read more »