Knee pain and the hip-knee continuum.

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Knee pain and the hip-knee continuum.

Knee pain in the gym recently? It might be time to load up the hips!

Knee pain is one of the most common presentations we see here at Stay Tuned Sports Medicine and it affects 25% of adults at some stage in their lives (Nguyen et al., 2012). In active populations we see a number of conditions affect the knee such as patella tracking syndrome, osteoarthritis, patella tendinopathy, fat pad impingement, and more.

Unfortunately, we often see clients opt to rest these injuries and skip lower body exercises (or skip entire classes!) rather than modify the exercise to suit their needs. While this may temporarily relieve the pain, as soon as you go back to lower body exercises the pain will be as severe or worse than before due to the tissues becoming weaker and less able to tolerate the load needed to perform these exercises.

So what can we do?

A great way to modify lower body exercises is to shift away from knee dominant exercises and move towards more hip-dominant exercises.

As shown below, exercises such as lunges and squats have a strong focus on knee movement and a large amount of … read more »

Should you rest after an injury?

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Should you rest after an injury?

Perhaps not.

Traditionally, our immediate response to a musculoskeletal injury is to rest and let the body heal itself, after all everyone who has done basic first aid knows that the R in R.I.C.E. is rest!

However, the importance on rest has been greatly overemphasised in the past and this thinking has perpetuated to this day, even though we have more and more evidence telling us that this may not be the best thing to do, and may even cause harm.

The reason for this is that these types of injuries cause a decrease in our body’s function (our body’s ability to move and perform activity) therefore to recover from these injuries we must focus on improving our body’s function, rather than not moving and waiting for the injury to resolve.

Instead of completely resting after an injury, your Osteopath/ Physiotherapist may give you modified exercises that mimic your chosen activity (e.g. walking instead of running). This strategy is known as relative rest, where we decrease the workload on the body but don’t completely remove the workload – known as absolute rest.

For any chronic injuries, such as chronic low back pain, or … read more »

Hydrotherapy: workout in water!

by (Physiotherapist)

HYDROTHERAPY: Water As A Workout!

And you don’t need to be able to swim!

Research is consistently showing hydrotherapy, or aquatic exercise, to be as effective as land-based exercise in reducing pain and improving function [3][7]. It’s no wonder that hydrotherapy has been used as a treatment modality for hundreds of years!

  • It’s low impact

Great for managing rheumatoid or osteoarthritis, those who have difficulties exercising on land due to impact or pain [4].

  •  Thermotherapy

Relaxes muscles and relives joint stiffness [6].

  • Assists with chronic conditions

Arthritis, Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia [6].

  • Preparation for or rehabilitation following joint replacement surgery
  • Facilitating recovery from certain strokes and brain injuries

But what really makes hydrotherapy so effective?

THE AMAZING PROPERTIES OF WATER

Buoyancy – The deeper you are submerged in water, the less you weigh. Exercising in water lessens the effects of impact exercise and relieves the joints of much of your bodyweight [1] [5]. Hence, one can tolerate a variety of exercise with better endurance, technique and reduced or no pain.

Heat – Hydrotherapy pools measure around 34°C in temperature, much warmer than your average lap pool! Heat increases circulation through the body, which can relieve muscle tightness and relieve stiffness in … read more »

Bursitis

by (Osteopath)

Bursitis? What is that?! 

Have you recently consulted with your Osteo or Physio who has referred you for an ultrasound? Did they mentioned the possibility that you have Bursitis? Well let me explain a bit about what that is!

Healthy vs BursitisWhat is a Bursa?

A Bursa is a fluid filled sac that acts as a cushion between muscles, tendons, joints and bones. The role of these Bursae is to reduce friction caused by movement around those joints. 

What is Bursitis?

Bursitis is inflammation of the Bursae. It is often a painful condition that affects the joints. It is commonly associated with over use or repetitive joint movements. It can however also be caused by poor postures, walking habits, long standing strength or structural imbalances. It is more common in those who are overweight, have some types of arthritis, elderly or diabetic, however it can also occur in healthy individuals. 

Common sites of Bursitis are: 

  • Shoulder 
  • Hip 
  • Knee 
  • Elbow 
  • Ankle 

Symptoms of Bursitis:

  • Pain or tenderness around the joint, especially if pressure is applied. 
  • Redness, warmth or swelling are usually uncommon but may be a sign of infection. 

Diagnosis of Bursitis:

A diagnosis of Bursitis is usually done through a thorough examination. … read more »

Tram Tran

by (Osteopath )

Tram is an enthusiastic and conscientious Osteopath who has graduated from RMIT University with a double bachelor’s degree in Health Sciences and Applied Sciences in Osteopathy.

Tram wants to truly understand the extent of how injury impacts upon her patient’s day-to-day life. She firmly believes in working collaboratively with her patients to create achievable goals in order to return them back to their life as soon as possible! Whilst in university, Tram discovered her passion for educating others in neuroscience and therefore, she endeavours to educate her patients regarding their diagnosis and their treatment plan.

Tram will commonly incorporate Dry Needling and Clinical Pilates as part of her treatments.

When not treating, Tram lives with two cats and can be found having a boogie wherever RnB is playing in Melbourne. She is a proud Melburnian who loves to visit cafes, bars, art galleries and anything hidden down a cobblestone laneway.… read more »

Pillows and Matresses

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

We spend a third of our lives (if you’re lucky) on our pillows and mattresses but often underestimate their influence on our health and bodies.
But how do you know a good mattress or pillow to a bad one?

My advice to patients is fairly simple. A good mattress is not about how hard or soft it is (that is based on your preference and weight) but how well it is sprung or conforms to your body’s shape. A simply test for this is to place an empty cup on the mattress and then push firmly down about 10cm away. On a good mattress, the cup should not fall towards your fist. This simulates your hips pushing into the mattress when side lying, whilst your spine remains supported. How hard you push depends on how heavy you are and your personal preference for a firm or soft mattress. Generally the heavier the body, the firmer the mattress.

With pillows we suggest you should always look for a contoured supportive pillow. Soft pillows may feel nice to begin with but over the course of hours, will generally provide no support for the neck. This is more important as we age and … read more »

Benefits of Hydrotherapy

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Who can do hydrotherapy? You.

Hydrotherapy is derived from the Greek words “hydro” meaning water and “therapia” meaning healing, and this form of therapeutic rehabilitation is a particularly useful mode of exercise treatment for many conditions.

Don’t worry; you don’t have to be able to swim (or have to get your hair wet) to gain the benefits from hydrotherapy. Each session is modified to the individual and is based on the condition, stage of rehab and the therapeutic goals set together with the treating practitioner.

Hydrotherapy sessions are taken in thermo-neutral water- this is water heated between 32-36degrees. It is highly beneficial as it is warm to the touch to help relieve pain and muscle spasm whilst at the same time increasing blood supply to the skin without having an effect on core temperature.

The buoyancy of the water unloads the weight of the body allowing minimal loading on the joints, gaining ease of movement and gives the space to focus on quality and control of the movement. Improvement in balance and proprioception is seen alongside strengthening of weak muscles.

Hydrotherapy is useful for:

  • Low risk pregnancies
  • Musculoskeletal problems, particularly where swelling is present
  • Conditions where land-based exercise causes pain
read more »

Posture, Breathing and Arthritis

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Osteoarthritis (OA)

OA is a group of chronic, degenerative conditions that effect joints (also known as Degenerative Joint Disease and osteoarthrosis). Arthritis means – inflammation of the joint but OA is more degenerative than inflammatory.  OA is the most common form of arthritis.

What happens to the joints in OA?

With repeated stress the cartilage in the joints initially thickens, then eventually breaks down, softens and becomes thinner. Later the underlying bone undergoes changes and becomes worn from contact of bone on bone.  Micro-fractures and cysts can appear which weaken the bone.  To support the joint, new bone is laid down at the edges of the joint and bony spurs occur which restrict movement.  These bony spurs can painfully compress nerve roots.

Symptoms:

Initially this is painless but the end result after a period of time is pain, bony enlargement and restricted mobility.

Where does OA occur?

Common locations of OA are in the hand, spine, hip and knee. Reduced pain and mobility are usually noticed in the morning or after periods of immobility and may improve as a person gets moving.  Nerve pain can also occur if nerves are irritated by bony spurs.

Diagnosis:

Diagnosis of OA can be … read more »

Natalie Miller

by (Myotherapist)

Natalie has a keen interest in injury prevention, management and maintenance stemming from personal experience as a competitive swimmer, athletics participant and basketball player. Natalie enjoys helping people achieve a musculoskeletal balance to help reach their optimal health.

She gained her Advanced Diploma of Myotherapy at RMIT in addition to a Diploma in Sports Development and Athlete Support, and has completed a 12 month soft tissue therapy internship at the Carlton football club. She treats a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions and more recently undertook further studies in pregnancy massage. She also has great results treating headaches and migraines, stress, tension and general aches and pains.

Using various soft tissue techniques, stretching and corrective exercise, Natalie is able to help you meet your goals and be your best whether you are a weekend warrior or serious athlete. She also enjoys hot rock massage to help melt your muscle tension away. With 9 years experience working at Knox Leisureworks YMCA, Natalie is a familiar face at the Boronia clinic.

 … read more »

Paul Hermann

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Stay Tuned’s founder Dr Paul Hermann believes whole heartedly in the company’s motto, Everybody Deserves to Feel Good. He believes it is our responsibility, and privilege to help everyone we interact with, to feel as good as possible.

Whilst studying Osteopathy, Paul completed his Masters research studying the ‘Effectiveness of Swiss Ball Training on Lower Back Stability’, before authoring the popular book ‘Effective Swiss Ball Training’. Paul thirst for knowledge, and to find more ways for people to “feel good”, lead him to additionally complete a Masters in Exercise Science.

As a therapist he has applied this principle to his clinical work with patients. As a lecturer, teaching Exercise Science and Rehabilitation at RMIT and Victoria University, and international presenter he has been able to pass on this principle to many thousands of students and other allied health practitioners and Doctors.

Paul continues to share his passion through his work in the Stay Tuned clinics, mentoring many practitioners, writing Health and Fitness related articles and travelling internationally to lecture and look after a variety of professional athletes and teams.

Paul works as an Osteopath & Exercise Scientist at both Boronia and Elwood clinics.… read more »