ITBS or Iliotibial Band Syndrome

by (Physiotherapist)

Do you experience pain on the outer part of your leg? Is it possible that you may have a problem with your ITB?

ITB stands for the iliotibial band. The iliotibial band is not a muscle, it is fascia that runs down the side of your leg. Since it is not a muscle, stretches for it are ineffective. Many people roll their ITB along a foam roller to loosen it, but often that does not resolve their pain.

The ITB is attached to several muscles in the hip. The tensor fascia latae (TFL) and the gluteus maximus (your buttocks) are the two major ones. Dysfunction of these muscles can cause the ITB to “tighten” and cause pain. This condition is called ITBS (iliotibial band syndrome).

Here are examples of some exercises that may be prescribed to you by your practitioner:

Sidelying plank with hip abduction:

Lying on your side, lift your body up over your forearm.

Move your top leg up, then down.

Repeat.

 

 

 

Isometric external rotation:

Lying on your stomach, touch both heels together

Push the heels together and hold for 5 seconds.

You can palpate your glutes to ensure that they are activating

Relax. Then … read more »

Hip Pain. Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

by (Osteopath)

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) may be a hard one to pronounce, but with the right help it isn’t hard to manage. FAI occurs when your hip joint does not form correctly during childhood developmental years. An increase in friction during movement of the hip joint causes abnormalities that are described as either Pincer, Cam or Mixed/Combined (as shown in image 1). In some cases, the hip may be provoked in some way due to the nature of your exercise or even occupation.

Femoroacetabular Impingement

Image 1 adapted from: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases–conditions/femoroacetabular-impingement/

FAI will often present as pain at the front of your hip or groin and you may notice your hip doesn’t move as well is it used to! These symptoms may come about during or following exercise, prolonged sitting and crossing the legs.

The diagnosis of FAI involves a detailed history, physical exam and radiographs of the pelvis. Your age and pre-injury activity level will come into consideration when determining if surgery is indicated or not. These options will first be discussed with your practitioner.

Recent studies have shown that initial conservative management for FAI may improve function and symptoms, so thankfully there are a few things you can do to help yourself get … read more »