Don’t ignore heel pain in young athletes.

by (Osteopath)

Is your young sports star suffering heel pain? Let me tell you, they are not alone. Heel pain in young growing active individuals is usually due to a condition medically known as “Severs Disease”. Although it sounds quite dramatic it is very common benign condition affecting active (boys usually) between the ages of 8 – 14. It is caused by an irritation of the growth plate of the heel bone brought on by recent an increased pull from the Achilles tendon. When your child is growing, it is usually the bones that start to grow first, leaving behind the muscles and tendons to adapt and catch up. This leads to the tendons pulling at the insertion site at the heel.

What are the symptoms?

  • Pain around the perimeter of the heel during physical exercise – particularly activities involving lots of jumping and running
  • Pain becomes worse at the BEGINNING and AFTER exercise
  • Changes in the way your child walks – walking on toes is common
  • Swelling, redness or tenderness around the back of the heel

How can we help?

The good news is, there are lots of effective ways to help your child throughout their active lifestyle during this stage. … read more »

How to Climb Mt Everest – a Guide to Goal Setting

by (Accredited Exercise Physiologist)

Have you ever set yourself a goal that seemed too big the next day? For example, climbing Mt Everest. Seemed like a good idea at the time, right? And then when you felt puffed after walking up a hill it made you disheartened so you settled for a block of chocolate instead?
mountain-climbing-802099_1920

Well here’s a secret. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and NO ONE has climbed Mt Everest in a day either.

When setting goals the easiest thing to do is see the finish sign but not the road to get there. Knowing the path and which direction to take makes it a lot easier to stay on track.

Clichés aside, here are a few tips on how to climb your mountain. Make your goal SMART.
S – Specific. “To lose weight” could be 1 gram or 50kgs. What is it EXACTLY that you want to achieve?
M – Measurable. Numbers, numbers, numbers!! How many times a week? How far? A great idea is to use different scales to measure how you feel. For example, after a run I feel 8/10 tired. Record it somewhere and be sure you check back and reflect on your progress!
A – … read more »

Sherry Michaels

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Physiotherapist

B.Physio

I love to treat:

  1. Chronic pain
  2. Neurological symptoms: dizziness, brain injuries, nerve injuries
  3. Back and neck pain

My Story

sherryinhutI grew up in a medical family so have always had an interest in the medical field. As I started thinking about my career path I realised I loved the complexity of the human body, was not going to cope with a desk job and had developed a passion for helping people and building their quality of life – physiotherapy was the answer!

masai mara

I love mid- to long distance running, being outdoors and enjoyed playing netball and tennis during my school years. I also know what it feels like to need someone to push you along and motivate you to keep active and fit. I love travelling and have a special love for Africa – having travelled to 8 African countries and volunteered as a physio in 3. I’ve learnt how to be creative with my resources, culturally aware and deeply care for the needs of other people. Experiences and memories that have helped to shape me as a person and a therapist.

After graduating I worked in a rehabilitation centre where I treated a mixed bag, from neurological … read more »

Dr. Josh Osborne

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Podiatrist & Personal Trainer

B.Pod & Cert IV Fitness

I love to treat:

  1. Plantar fasciitis/heel pain
  2. Achilles tendonopathy
  3. Complex biomechanical issues

My Story

Throughout my life I have been obsessed with sport. The fight, the passion, the want of winning. I wanted to be better than everyone else.

I love all sports. I have been, along with my family, a member of the Carlton Football Club, spending most weekends either at the game or watching it together.

My sporting life began with tennis; tennis had been in my family. My grandpa was a tennis coach and one of the top junior players in Victoria before getting polio, and my dad was also a very handy player. I spent most days after school on the court practicing, whether it was with friends or working on my serve alone. For years the only thing I wanted in life was to one day play in a grand slam. I spent everyday at school playing sport; I never really learnt how to play casual, fun sport, I would always put in 110%.

Kung Fu was another love of mine and was a very important part of my life as it taught me to be … read more »

Dr. Paul Hermann

by (Osteopath & Exercise Scientist)

Osteopath & Exercise Scientist

B.Sc.(Cli.Sc.), M.H.Sc.(Osteo), M.Ex.Sc(S&C), Member AOA

I love to treat:

  1. people motivated to improve their complete health
  2. people who have tried everything & everyone else
  3. people who want to exercise to prevent injury and illness in future

My Story

“When I stop loving it, I’ll stop doing it…”

Growing up I wanted to be an architect, Maverick from the movie ‘Top Gun’ and a fireman. I also am told by my mum that I wanted to work in a zoo and write stories, oh and be a World Class Athlete. I always loved sport and staying fit, was always competitive and did many sports as a kid. In grade 3 once winning a running race while my ankle was broken and in plaster. Well, at the start of the race it was in plaster but by the end the plaster was more broken than my ankle. I however proudly told my very angry Doctor that I won as he re plastered my ankle.. Oops.

As it will become evident my love of sport meant I was often injured. My most common injury in primary school was a black eye from lunchtime sport. In grade 5 I got … read more »